Local News
9:00 am
Sun October 20, 2013

What We're Reading | 10.20.13

Credit Creative Commons

Each week, members of the WFPL News team spotlight interesting stories we've read and enjoyed, for your weekend reading pleasure:

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Technology
6:57 am
Sun October 20, 2013

When Playing Video Games Means Sitting On Life's Sidelines

The reSTART center for Internet addiction is in the woods outside Seattle. The initial, inpatient part of the program is held on a property that has a treehouse and a garden.
Rachel Martin NPR

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 4:49 pm

A facility outside Seattle, surrounded by pine trees, is a refuge for addicts — of technology.

There are chickens, a garden and a big treehouse with a zip line. A few guys kick a soccer ball around between therapy appointments in the cottage's grassy backyard.

The reSTART center was set up in 2009. It treats all sorts of technology addictions, but most of the young men who come through here — and they are all young men — have the biggest problem with video games.

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Education
6:56 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Civil Rights Letters to be on Digital Display at the University of Louisville

Martin Luther King Jr.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

The Civil Rights movement of the 1960s had many voices of support.

In Louisville, one of those voices was Anne Braden. Braden wrote many letters to Martin Luther King Jr. Some expressed support—others asked for support.

Those letters, along with other original documents associated with the Civil Rights movement, will be on digital display at the Ekstrom Library on the University of Louisville campus from Oct. 21 through Oct. 25.

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Parallels
6:42 am
Sun October 20, 2013

You Have Questions About The NSA; We Have Answers

A sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 4:48 pm

Four months have passed since former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden began spilling secrets about the NSA's surveillance programs, but many Americans still don't know what to think about the disclosures.

For good reason. The surveillance programs are highly technical, involving the bulk interception of huge volumes of communication data as they traverse multiple links and networks. The laws governing what the NSA can do are complex and open to conflicting interpretations.

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Local News
6:39 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Free Inspections for Lead Available to Qualified Louisville Residents

The Lead Safe Louisville Project is promoting free screenings for qualified homeowners in conjunction with this week’s National Lead Poisoning Prevention Week.

Metro Community Services spokeswoman Debbie Belt says the screening is open to Louisvillians whose homes were built before 1978 and who have children younger than 6, among others.

“Any homes or apartments or others built before 1978 are likely to have lead-based paint. So, yes, indeed it’s still an issue and it’s something we just want to make people aware of.”

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Local News
9:26 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

Louisville Man Accused in High-Profile Shooting Deaths Found Dead in Metro Jail

Louisville Metro Corrections
Credit Google Maps

The suspect in the 2012 shooting deaths of two men during an eastern Louisville neighborhood homeowners' association meeting committed suicide Saturday in his jail cell, Louisville Metro officials said.

Mahmoud Y. Hindi was found hanged using bed sheets Saturday about 10 minutes after Metro Corrections staff saw him praying in his cell, according to a news release from Metro government. CPR was performed and he was taken by ambulance to University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead.

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The Two-Way
2:54 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

Violin Said To Have Been On The Titanic Sells For $1.6M

This violin is said to have been played by bandmaster Wallace Hartley during the final moments before the sinking of the Titanic. It's thought he put the instrument in that leather case. Hartley's body and the case were found by a ship that responded to the disaster. Now the violin has been sold.
Peter Muhly AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 2:37 pm

An anonymous buyer on Saturday paid about $1.6 million for a violin believed to have been played by one of the musicians who famously stayed aboard as the Titanic sank in the icy waters of the North Atlantic in April 1912.

The Associated Press writes that "the sea-corroded instrument, now unplayable, is thought to have belonged to bandmaster Wallace Hartley, who was among the disaster's more than 1,500 victims."

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Politics
11:38 am
Sat October 19, 2013

'It Takes A Crisis': How '73 Embargo Fueled Change In U.S.

Drivers and a man pushing a lawnmower line up at gas station in San Jose, Calif., in March 1974.
AP

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 7:26 pm

Americans started thinking differently about U.S. dependence on imported oil 40 years ago this Sunday. Decades later, the U.S. is in the midst of a homegrown energy boom.

The oil embargo began in 1973. The United States had long taken cheap and plentiful oil for granted when Saudi Arabia shocked the country by suddenly cutting off all direct oil shipments in retaliation for U.S. support of Israel. Other Arab countries followed suit.

Prices soared. Gasoline lines stretched for blocks. Richard Nixon became the first of many U.S. presidents to call for energy independence.

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Local News
6:50 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Serpent Experts Try To Demystify Pentecostal Snake Handling

Pastor Jamie Coots holds a snake at Full Gospel Tabernacle in Jesus Name Church of Middlesboro, Ky.
NGO

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 10:09 pm

Two weeks ago, NPR reported on a group of Pentecostals in Appalachia who handle snakes in church to prove their faith in God. The story got us thinking: Why are the handlers bitten so rarely, and why are so few of those snakebites lethal?

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Business
6:49 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Business Leaders Decry The Economic Cost Of Uncertainty

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 12:08 pm

Running a company is like driving a car. You need to be able to see what's coming down the road. The dysfunction in Washington has created a fog, and when driving in the fog, you have to slow down.

That's basically what's happening at thousands of companies around the country.

Bob Mosey, chairman of the National Tooling and Machining Association, bemoans the "uncertainty of not being able to plan for the future."

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