Law
6:36 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Justice Department Tackles Quality Of Defense For The Poor

People wait in line outside the Supreme Court in February. In a landmark decision half a century ago, the justices guaranteed a lawyer for criminal defendants who are too poor to afford one.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 11:37 am

All over the country, lawyers who defend poor people in criminal cases have been sharing their stories about painful budget cuts. Some federal public defenders have shut their doors to new clients after big layoffs. And in many states, the public defense system has operated in crisis for years.

But an unprecedented recent court filing from the Justice Department has cheered the typically overburdened attorneys who represent the poor and could have dramatic implications for the representation of indigent defendants.

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NPR Story
6:36 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Wide Economic Gap Between Blacks And Whites Persists

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:55 pm

While American blacks have made some social and financial gains in the past 50 years, studies show the economic gaps between blacks and whites have remained or widened.

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Education
3:42 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

JCPS Board Offers 'Community Conversations' To Answer Questions

Credit Shutterstock.com

Members of the Jefferson County Board of Education will hold a series of public discussions that will begin this week to connect with parents and stakeholders.

Part of the district’s strategic plan--Vision 2015--involves more community outreach, and chairwoman Diane Porter says to meet that goal the board developed the idea of "Community Conversations" earlier this year.

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Education
3:00 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Parent Leadership Classes Begin For 37 In JCPS

The Governor’s Commonwealth Institute for Parent Leadership will begin training in Louisville this week, giving parents with children in struggling  schools a chance to change the way they participate in their education.

The institute was started by Kentucky’s Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence 16 years ago, says Carol Edelen, Prichard's community supports coordinator.

Since then, funding has dried up and fewer  training opportunities  have been offered, but the institute is needed, she says.

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Arts and Humanities
2:00 pm
Mon September 2, 2013

Ali Center Hosts Exhibit of Iconic Motown Images

White 'protesters' picket Motown's "Hitsville U.S.A." offices in Detroit as part of Al Abrams' March on Hitsville publicity stunt, July 14, 1964
Credit Courtesy of Al Abrams

Motown Records founder Berry Gordy, Jr. hired fellow Detroit native Al Abrams in 1959 to serve as publicist for his fledgling record label. Abrams was 18 at the time, and Motown’s first employee.

“Present at the creation, so to speak,” says Abrams. “It was incredible. I’m surrounded by all these geniuses, people who are creating music left and right – artists, songwriters, producers. And I’m actually getting a paycheck for all of this, too. And I’m beginning to think I must be the luckiest kid in all of Detroit. And I probably was.”

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Environment
11:46 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Parklands of Floyds Fork to Unveil 677 New Acres Next Weekend

A rendering of the finished Parklands
Wallace Roberts & Todd Parklands of Floyds Fork

The Parklands at Floyds Fork will more than double in size next weekend. The park will hold events on Friday, Saturday and Sunday to commemorate the opening of 677 acres of new public space in southeastern Jefferson County.

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Education
9:43 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Kentucky Students May Post Highest Graduation and College-and-Career Rates in State History

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday is calling the early results of the state's accountability process promising—he says public school students may post their best results ever in two major categories.

The Kentucky Department of Education implemented its new accountability system in 2012. When this years results are released--which is expected to happen at the end of this month--it will be the first time schools and districts can measure the certain results, like college-and-career readiness, against a previous year.

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Environment
8:00 am
Mon September 2, 2013

For the First Time, Several Parcels from City's Land Bank Will Go to a Market Garden

Vassil Wikimedia Commons

There will soon be a new market garden in Louisville’s Portland neighborhood, made possible by the purchase of property bought from the city’s Land Bank Authority. This is the first time this land has been sold for the sole purpose of growing food commercially in the city.

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U.S.
7:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Cincinnati's Airport: Best In The U.S.?

A passenger rides an escalator to Terminal A at the Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport in Erlanger, Ky.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 4:45 am

In the grand days of railroad travel, passengers arrived in monumental terminals. There was grandeur, style and comfort — qualities that today's equivalent for long-distance travel, the airport, mostly lack. Especially in the United States.

In a survey of international travelers by the British firm Skytrax, not a single U.S. airport ranked anywhere near the top of the list. Singapore got top honors, while the best the United States could do was Cincinnati's airport — which came in at No. 30.

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Politics
7:45 am
Mon September 2, 2013

Syria Resolution Could Be A Hard Sell On Capitol Hill

From left, Rep. Sander Levin, D-Mich., Rep. Robert Scott, D-Va., and Rep. Brad Schneider, D- ll., walk to a closed members-only briefing on Syria on Sunday.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon September 2, 2013 6:41 pm

Twenty-four hours after President Obama announced on Saturday that he'll wait for congressional authorization before launching strikes on Syria; members of Congress attended a classified briefing at the Capitol.

For days, most of the discontent among members of Congress has been about not being included in the deliberations on Syria, about not getting the chance to vote. Now that they've gotten their way, each member of Congress will have to go on the record.

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