Arts and Humanities
10:23 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Lexington Philharmonic, Management Avoid Strike

LEXINGTON - A strike by The Lexington Philharmonic musicians has been averted, and the company’s season will open as scheduled tonight at the University of Kentucky’s Singletary Center.

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All Tech Considered
9:30 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Female Fans Love New Grand Theft Auto Despite Demeaning Content

A close view of the packaging of Grand Theft Auto V at the midnight opening at the HMV music store in London on Tuesday. It made history with a record $800 million in sales on its first day. This version continues to generate controversy over its glorification of violence, drugs and its demeaning portraits of women.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 2:02 pm

Grand Theft Auto made video game history this week: The latest version of the game had a record $800 million in sales on its first day. As with past versions, the game is generating controversy over its glorification of violence and drugs and its demeaning portrayal of women.

But around 15 percent of its fans are women, who find much to like about the game, even if they do have some ambivalence about it.

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The Two-Way
6:53 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Report: Cases Of Elderly Dementia To Nearly Triple By 2050

A woman suffering from Alzheimer's disease holds the hand of a relative in a retirement house in Angervilliers, France.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 6:25 pm

By the middle of the century, the number of older people suffering from Alzheimer's and other forms of dementia will nearly triple, severely straining caregiving resources, the charity Alzheimer's Disease International says in a new study released Thursday.

Currently, some 100 million people globally suffer from the potentially fatal disease. That number is expected to increase to 277 million by 2050, as the graying population increases, The World Alzheimer's Report 2013 says.

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The Two-Way
6:52 am
Fri September 20, 2013

13 People Shot In Chicago; 3-Year-Old Most Seriously Wounded

The scene late Thursday at a park in Chicago's South Side after a shooting there in which 13 people were wounded.
Paul Beaty AP

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 12:24 pm

  • From the NPR Newscast: Cheryl Corley reports on the shootings in Chicago
  • On 'Morning Edition': "After Shooting Tragedies, States React With Legislation"

(Our most recent update, at 12:15 p.m. ET., is here.)

A work week that began with a mass shooting in Washington, D.C., that left 12 victims dead concludes with a mass shooting in Chicago in which 13 people, including a 3-year-old boy, were wounded.

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Politics
7:33 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Congressman John Yarmuth Lone Kentucky Lawmaker to Vote Against $40 Billion in Food Stamp Cuts

Credit File photo

In a close vote, the U.S. House of Representatives approved a Republican-backed plan to cut food stamps by $40 billion over the next decade, which supporters say will bring sustainability to the program while saving the taxpayer's money.

Lawmakers approved the proposal by a 217-210 vote on Thursday with 15 GOP members joining the entire Democratic caucus who voted against the bill.

The cuts to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) are nearly double as much as an earlier measure rejected by the House in June.

But supporters of the assistance program argue this could have a disproportionate impact on poorer states like Kentucky, where one out of six households report facing serious problems affording nutritious food.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, food stamps benefits go to around 820,000 Kentuckians per month. In the final tally, all but one of Kentucky's six representatives voted for the cuts.

"Today’s House vote to strip nearly $40 billion from federal food assistance programs directly threatens the health and financial security of the more than 44,000 Louisville families who depend on these programs to put food on their tables," says Democratic Congressman John Yarmuth, who voted against the bill. "These cuts would also needlessly weaken our economy, as every $5 spent on food assistance generates $9 in local economic activity."

But GOP lawmakers who favored the proposal drafted by Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia, highlight the rise of food stamp recipients in the past five years as a need to bring solvency to the program. The argue it simply restores eligibility limits to their original levels, and maintains funding for food assistance in other areas.

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Local News
6:21 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Kentucky Legislative Research Commission Finishes Inquiry Into John Arnold Sexual Harassment Claims

Former Rep. John Arnold
Jonathan Meador/WFPL News

A letter from the Legislative Research Commission detailing what it said is its agency’s handling of sexual harassment complaints against former Kentucky state Rep. John Arnold “raises more questions than answers,” said an attorney representing two of Arnold's accusers.

Laura Hendrix, general counsel to the LRC, wrote in a Sept. 19 letter to attorney Thomas Clay that “the LRC investigative team has concluded the investigation into assertions brought by your clients Cassaundra Cooper and Yolanda Costner regarding Representative John Arnold.”

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Politics
4:35 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

'Coal Country' State Democrats Defend Alison Lundergan Grimes from GOP Attacks

Kentucky U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes

Democratic state lawmakers representing Eastern Kentucky are coming to the defense of U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes, saying Republican incumbent Mitch McConnell has failed the coal industry.

The comments come as Grimes is being pilloried by Republicans after Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid blocked a bill McConnell proposed to ease federal regulations on coal operators.

An industry leader questioned if Grimes could stand up to Reid or the Obama administration.

But state representatives from coalfield areas in the state argue it's McConnell who hasn't done enough to help the struggling industry.

From the Grimes campaign:

"You will not find a stronger advocate than I am for our coal miners and the communities they call home," says state Rep. Leslie Combs, who represents parts of Harlan, Letcher, and Pike Counties. "Mitch McConnell has been in Washington for 30 years, yet he has let Kentucky's greatest industry die on his watch. He likes to tout his leadership in the Senate and on coal. If Senator McConnell has been such a powerful leader on coal, the industry would be thriving and not dying. It's time to put partisanship and rhetoric aside to work together to put Kentuckians back to work."

Other lawmakers such as state House Majority Floor Leader Rocky Adkins and Rep. John Short spoke to Grimes's ability to "reach across the aisle."

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The Salt
4:15 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

'Mountain Dew Mouth' Is Destroying Appalachia's Teeth, Critics Say

Appalachia has a distinct culture of sipping soda constantly throughout the day. "Here in West Virginia, you see people carrying around bottles of Mountain Dew all the time — even at a public health conference," says public health researcher Dana Singer.
Jin Lee Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 20, 2013 11:50 am

Obesity. Diabetes. By now, we've all heard of the health risks posed by drinking too much soda.

But over in Appalachia, the region that stretches roughly from southern New York state to Alabama, the fight against soda is targeting an altogether different concern: rotted teeth.

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Arts and Humanities
3:15 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

REVIEW | Truth, Youth and Beauty Shine in Kentucky Opera's 'La Bohème'

Rodolfo (Patrick O'Halloran) and Marcello (Luis Orozco) comfort Mimi (Corinne Winters) on her deathbed as Schaunard (Christiaan Smith-Kotlarek), Musetta (Emily Albrink) and Colline (John Arnold) look on.
Credit Patrick Pfister / Kentucky Opera

The Kentucky Opera opens its season Friday with a gorgeous production of Giacomo Puccini’s “La Bohème.” The talented cast is young and beautiful, Robert Little’s set is sumptuous, and when combined with Puccini’s stirring score – let’s just say that freezing in a shabby candlelit Paris apartment with your underemployed friends never felt so appealing.  

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Local News
2:35 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Web Publishing Veteran Neil Budde is the New Courier-Journal Editor

Neil Budde
Credit WKU.edu

The Courier-Journal's new top editor is an Internet journalism veteran with Kentucky roots.

Neil Budde was introduced Thursday as the replacement for Bennie Ivory, the Louisville newspaper's executive editor since 1997. Ivory retired in July.

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