Politics
7:30 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Ky. Environmentalists Want Alison Lundergan Grimes to Address Energy Future Beyond Coal

Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes

In Kentucky's U.S. Senate race, environmentalists says there's little to distinguish Democrat Alison Lundergan Grimes from Republican incumbent Mitch McConnell on coal.

But activists say what they're most disappointed about is Grimes hasn't outlined an agenda that speaks to the future of Kentucky's economy or the country's energy needs.

Ahead of new federal rules limiting greenhouse gas emissions, the Grimes campaign presented a decidedly pro-coal message by scolding the Obama administration.

When the Environmental Protection Agency released those proposed standards last week, Grimes reiterated her disappointment, saying the regulations were "out of touch" with Kentucky's needs and would hurt middle-class families.

The Grimes campaign told WFPL the first-term secretary of state does acknowledge climate change and the effects carbon emissions have on the planet's weather patterns.

But aides quickly pivoted to emphasize what they call "unnecessary regulations" that hurt Kentuckians who rely on the coal industry to provide for their families.

"While it is important to protect the environment, it is just as important to make sure the men and women of Kentucky are able to provide for their families,"  said Grimes campaign spokeswoman Charly Norton. "As Senator, Alison will work to protect the jobs of hardworking Kentuckians in any solution to the changing climate."

A 2007 Supreme Court ruling found that greenhouse gases created by coal-fired plants are pollutants that are harmful to human health, and are thus subject to regulation.

Longtime Louisville environmental activist Sarah Lynn Cunningham says voters who care about the environment are frustrated with Grimes and that enthusiasm is already declining more than a year before Election Day.

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Around the Nation
6:59 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Strained Foster Care System A 'Meter Of Our Social Problems'

Claudia Felder, 21, was in and out of the U.S. foster care system for nearly 10 years before she found a permanent family. Her difficult story ended happily, but that's not always the case for the 400,000 kids in foster care in America.
Daniel Hajek NPR

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 12:02 pm

Claudia Felder lives in Chino, Calif., with her parents. It's a wholesome scene: nice house, three dogs and a parrot and happy family pictures everywhere.

You'd have no idea that the composed, cheerful, articulate young woman got off to a rough start in life.

Felder spent much of her childhood in foster care, starting when she was 3 years old. She's 21 now, and has been living happily with her adoptive family. But memories of an abusive past still haunt her.

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Arts and Humanities
6:46 am
Mon September 23, 2013

'No Such Thing as Useless Knowledge': Louisville's IdeaFestival Returns

Credit Shutterstock.com

When Kris Kimel founded IdeaFestival 13 years ago in Lexington, he says it wasn’t an easy concept to explain. The celebration of innovation and creativity lacked a tangible hook – it’s not based on a product, it’s not targeted at one industry. Is it a tech conference? An arts festival? A business seminar? Well, yes.

“It wasn't the easiest thing to communicate," says Kimel.

"We couldn't give away tickets,” he adds with a laugh.  

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Education
5:24 am
Mon September 23, 2013

What if Meeting College or Career-Ready Standards Was Mandatory to Graduate in Kentucky?

Credit Shutterstock.com

A southern Kentucky school district is exceeding state requirements by requiring all students to meet college or career-ready standards before getting their high school diploma.

  

The state measures college and career readiness through various tests and credential students can earn. While it’s a large part of Kentucky’s accountability system, it’s not a requirement to graduate statewide. 

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Education
6:20 pm
Sun September 22, 2013

The Sad Death Of An Adjunct Professor Sparks A Labor Debate

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 6:19 pm

The death of a long-time, part-time professor in Pittsburgh is gathering the attention of instructors nationwide. The trend of relying on part-time faculty has been in the works for decades, and Margaret Mary Vojtko's story is seen by some as a tragic byproduct.

Last spring, months before her death, Vojtko showed up at a meeting between adjunct professors at Duquesne University and the union officials who had been trying to organize them. The professors are trying to organize a union affiliated with the United Steelworkers.

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Monkey See
7:16 am
Sun September 22, 2013

On TV's Big Night, Can Netflix Crash The Emmy Party?

Neil Patrick Harris will host the 65th Primetime Emmy Awards Sunday on CBS.
Nino Munoz CBS

Originally published on Sun September 22, 2013 12:10 am

It might seem like the only TV serious viewers are paying attention to right now is Breaking Bad, but on Sunday night, just as Walter White's penultimate episode is unfolding on AMC, we'll be finding out over on CBS whether his show, his portrayer Bryan Cranston, or other personnel will be taking home Primetime Emmy Awards.

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Local News
7:12 am
Sun September 22, 2013

After Cuts, How Many Fewer Children Are Using Kentucky's Child Care Assistance Program?

Credit Creative Commons

Earlier this week, Kentucky children's advocates and others lobbied state legislators to halt drastic cuts to a program that provides financial aid to low-income working families to cover child care costs.

Those cuts, announced earlier this year, changed the eligibility requirements for the Kentucky Child Care Assistance Program. They went into full effect on July 1. 

It's been two months. Here's how many kids have lost access to CCAP.

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Local News
6:53 am
Sun September 22, 2013

Out-of-Production Technology Gets New Life in Louisville and Elsewhere

Polaroid SX-70
Credit Creative Commons

Beneath the wedge-shaped leather and chrome-coated exterior of the Polaroid SX-70 camera lies a collection of aspheric mirrors — a unique single lens reflex system that ensures the image in the viewfinder is the same image transferred to the film. And the film develops minutes after the picture is taken. No darkroom. No complex interchangeable lenses. No litter. No fuss. (1)

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Local News
3:38 pm
Sat September 21, 2013

Cards Crush Florida International 72-0

Teddy Bridgewater threw four touchdown passes and Louisville's defense allowed a school-record 30 yards, helping the Cardinals blow out Florida International 72-0 on Saturday.

It was the highest scoring game for the Cardinals (4-0) since a 73-10 victory over Murray State in 2007. It also matched the school's fourth-largest margin of victory.

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