Byline | Inmate Starvation Death; Rupp Arena Financing; Restoring Childcare Funding Cuts

Here is our Byline rundown for today (full audio available below):

At the top – The starvation death of an inmate at the Kentucky State Penitentiary at Eddyville has raised questions about prison medical care and how officials at the facility deal with hunger strikes. We talk with Brett Barrouquere of the Associated Press, who broke the story this week about the death of inmate James Kenneth Embry, who had three years left on a nine year sentence for drug offenses.  Embry’s death has resulted in the firing of a prison doctor and the pending dismissal of two other staff members.

Inmate Death; Rupp Arena Financing; Restoring Childcare Funding Cuts: Byline 4/25/14 by Byline on WFPL

8:15 – Government officials in Lexington are trying to secure funding for a large renovation project in the city’s downtown, a makeover of Rupp Arena, the home of the Kentucky Wildcats and the surrounding complex.  It brings to mind the some of the processes that led to the construction of Louisville’s new downtown arena, the KFC Yum Center, and that has come up in the discussions.  We check in with Beth Musgrave of the Lexington Herald Leader has been covering the ongoing story. 

15:10- This Sunday marks the beginning of Holocaust Remembrance Week.  Here in Louisville, the Jewish Community Relations Council will hold an observance Monday night at the Kentucky Center for the Arts.

It’s called “Pouring Out the Heart:  Learning from Personal Holocaust Stories.” WFPL’s Rick Howlett spoke this week with two Holocaust survivors whose recollections are included in a locally-produced film that will be unveiled at the gathering.

19:30 – More working low-income Kentucky families will be able to get a state subsidy for child care after the General Assembly added funds in its recently concluded session. The legislature  is giving $38.8 million to the program in the next fiscal year and $58.3 million the following year. But the state agency that manages the program is still analyzing its next steps before the new budget goes into effect in July. Last year, the Cabinet for Health and Family Services cut eligibility because of a budget deficit. Since the cuts, the number of children served through the program has dropped six percent each month. WFPL’s Joseph Lord has details.

24:40 – This weekend, dozens of coffee shop employees will step out from behind the counter and stand in front of judges. They’re heading to Seattle to compete in a variety of coffee competitions, from brewing to roasting to putting intricate designs in the milk on top of a latte. It’s like the coffee olympics, and as WFPL’s Gabe Bullard reports two local baristas are hoping to bring home top honors.

29:00 – Raising the minimum wage is a divisive issue, both nationally and closer to home – Louisville Metro Councilwoman Attica Scott is moving forward with an ordinance that would eventually raise local workers’ hourly wages to $10.10 over the next three years. This piece from Back Story with the American History Guys looks at how the Great Depression led to the institution of a federal minimum wage, and how it affected the economy.

37:40 – WFPL’s arts and humanities reporter Erin Keane talks about some noteworthy arts events happening locally in the near future, then we hear her feature report about the Louisville Underground Music Archive.  She also speaks with cartoonist Ben Katchor, who is giving a lecture and teaching a workshop at the Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft on Sunday.

Comments