White Nose Syndrome http://wfpl.org en Kentucky to Get $47,000 to Study White Nose Syndrome http://wfpl.org/post/kentucky-get-47000-study-white-nose-syndrome <p>The federal government is giving Kentucky $47,500 to study a fatal bat disease. In total, 28 states will get more than $950,000 in grants for projects designed to track and research <a href="http://whitenosesyndrome.org/" target="_blank">White Nose Syndrome</a>.</p><p>The disease has been decimating bat populations in 22 states—including Kentucky—and 5 Canadian provinces for the past seven years. Bats are essential in keeping insect populations under control, and are an important part of the ecosystem.</p> Mon, 01 Jul 2013 13:30:08 +0000 Fiona Grant 5969 at http://wfpl.org Kentucky to Get $47,000 to Study White Nose Syndrome Fatal Bat Disease Found in Two Kentucky State Parks http://wfpl.org/post/fatal-bat-disease-found-two-kentucky-state-parks <p>White Nose Syndrome has been found in two Kentucky state parks. State officials announced today that infected bats have turned up in caves at Carter Cave State Resort Park in Carter County and the Kingdom Come State Park Nature Preserve in Letcher County.</p> Fri, 15 Feb 2013 16:03:52 +0000 Erica Peterson 4022 at http://wfpl.org Fatal Bat Disease Found in Two Kentucky State Parks Deadly Bat Disease Found in Mammoth Cave National Park http://wfpl.org/post/deadly-bat-disease-found-mammoth-cave-national-park <p>White Nose Syndrome has been confirmed in Mammoth Cave National Park.</p><p>White Nose Syndrome is caused by a white fungus, and is deadly to bats. Since 2006, the fungus has been found in 21 states. The disease has killed more than 6 million bats in four Canadian provinces and 19 states, including Kentucky. Mammoth Cave has been taking steps to keep the fungus out of its caves--like making visitors walk over cleansing mats--but park superintendent Sarah Craighead confirmed the disease's presence today.</p><p>From the news release:</p> Wed, 16 Jan 2013 17:11:59 +0000 Erica Peterson 3450 at http://wfpl.org Deadly Bat Disease Found in Mammoth Cave National Park New Agreement Will Help Protect Endangered Bat Habitats http://wfpl.org/post/new-agreement-will-help-protect-endangered-bat-habitats <p>A new agreement between federal and state governments aims to protect endangered Indiana Bats that spend part of the year in Kentucky's forests.</p><p>In the agreement, the Kentucky Division of Forestry will take the Indiana Bat into account when it manages the more than 43,000 acres of state forest land.</p><p>Indiana Bats have been on the nation’s endangered species list since 1967. In recent years, they’ve become increasingly vulnerable due to White Nose Syndrome—a fungal disease that’s fatal to bats.</p> Tue, 11 Dec 2012 20:19:49 +0000 Erica Peterson 2917 at http://wfpl.org New Agreement Will Help Protect Endangered Bat Habitats No Bats Yet in Artificial Tennessee Cave http://wfpl.org/post/no-bats-yet-artificial-tennessee-cave <p>So far there are no bats hibernating in <a href="http://wfpl.org/post/artificial-cave-may-help-researchers-study-deadly-bat-disease" target="_blank">an artificial cave built in Tennessee</a> to help protect the animals from a deadly fungus. But the project’s sponsors are holding out hope for next year.</p> Mon, 10 Dec 2012 14:05:00 +0000 Erica Peterson 2877 at http://wfpl.org No Bats Yet in Artificial Tennessee Cave Artificial Cave May Help Researchers Study Deadly Bat Disease http://wfpl.org/post/artificial-cave-may-help-researchers-study-deadly-bat-disease <p>Researchers in Tennessee hope the creation of an artificial cave will help stop the progress of a deadly bat disease.</p><p><a href="http://whitenosesyndrome.org/" target="_blank">White Nose Syndrome </a>was discovered in 2006 in upstate New York, and now it has spread to four Canadian provinces and 19 states, including Kentucky. The disease is caused by a white fungus, and so far scientists aren’t really sure how to control it.</p> Mon, 24 Sep 2012 12:24:00 +0000 Erica Peterson 1745 at http://wfpl.org Artificial Cave May Help Researchers Study Deadly Bat Disease Kentucky to Receive Federal Grant to Continue Studying Fatal Bat Disease http://wfpl.org/post/kentucky-receive-federal-grant-continue-studying-fatal-bat-disease <p>Kentucky is among 30 states that will receive federal funds to boost monitoring for a deadly bat disease.</p> Mon, 09 Jul 2012 19:58:47 +0000 Erica Peterson 956 at http://wfpl.org Kentucky to Receive Federal Grant to Continue Studying Fatal Bat Disease