Harry Wu http://wfpl.org en Former Chinese Political Prisoner Harry Wu: U.S. Companies Too Cozy with Communist China http://wfpl.org/post/former-chinese-political-prisoner-us-companies-too-cozy-communist-china <p>Communism in China brought mixed reactions for a young Harry Wu.</p><p>When he visited poorer regions of the country, Wu could see some benefits for the poor. But Wu's father was a banker, among the capitalist class who were being persecuted in Mao's China. He considered leaving — maybe going to the then-British controlled Hong Kong — but he decided to stay in China and study.&nbsp;</p><p>His family's past wealth caused him harassment until, in 1960, he was shipped off to a labor camp. And in labor camps he'd stay for the next 19 years.</p> Wed, 23 Jan 2013 11:50:34 +0000 Joseph Lord 3548 at http://wfpl.org Former Chinese Political Prisoner Harry Wu: U.S. Companies Too Cozy with Communist China Harry Wu, Former Chinese Political Prisoner, to Discuss U.S.-China Relations in Louisville http://wfpl.org/post/harry-wu-former-chinese-political-prisoner-discuss-us-china-relations-louisville <p>Harry Wu, a former Chinese political prisoner and later a human rights activist, will discuss U.S.-China relations on Jan. 23 at the Brown &amp; Williamson Club at Papa John's Cardinal Stadium.</p><p>The speech, called "In the Mouth of the Dragon: U.S. and China Relations in the 21st Century," is sponsored by the UofL Center for Asian Democracy.</p><p>Wu was a Chinese political prisoner for 19 years starting in 1960. He later came to the United States and founded the Washington, D.C.-based Laogai Research Foundation, which aims to raise awareness of China's system of forced labor camps.</p> Wed, 09 Jan 2013 19:43:06 +0000 Joseph Lord 3334 at http://wfpl.org Harry Wu, Former Chinese Political Prisoner, to Discuss U.S.-China Relations in Louisville