beyonce http://wfpl.org en Strange Fruit: Cirque du Soleil Brings Michael Jackson’s Work to Louisville http://wfpl.org/post/strange-fruit-cirque-du-soleil-brings-michael-jackson-s-work-louisville <p><object classid="clsid:d27cdb6e-ae6d-11cf-96b8-444553540000" codebase="http://download.macromedia.com/pub/shockwave/cabs/flash/swflash.cab#version=6,0,40,0" height="81" width="100%"><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="src" value="https://player.soundcloud.com/player.swf?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/144695150&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_playcount=true&amp;show_comments=true" /><embed allowscriptaccess="always" height="81" src="https://player.soundcloud.com/player.swf?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/144695150&amp;color=ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=true&amp;show_playcount=true&amp;show_comments=true" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="100%"></embed></object><br />&nbsp;</p><p>For most of us, Michael Jackson's death is one of those where-were-you moments.<br /><br />"When I found out MJ died, Jai was with me in the car, and I pulled the car over at a gas station and I started bawling, crying. And he thought my dad had died," Dr. Story says. "Michael Jackson was very symbolic to me of my childhood - listening to his music with my dad when I was a little girl, and I just didn't expect him to die like that."<br /><br />When we heard Cirque du Soleil had put together a stage production based on the King of Pop's music and dance, we wanted to find out more. So this week we spoke to Laura Silverman who does publicity for the group about how the show came together, and the challenges of bringing such a legendary life to the stage. The show will be <a href="http://www.kfcyumcenter.com/events/detail/michael-jackson-the-immortal-world-tour-by-cirque-du-soleil">at the KFC Yum Center</a> on April 25th and 26th.<br /> Mon, 14 Apr 2014 21:35:21 +0000 Laura Ellis 9142 at http://wfpl.org Strange Fruit: Cirque du Soleil Brings Michael Jackson’s Work to Louisville Strange Fruit: Boy Scouts, Beyoncé, and Mark Anthony Neal on Black Masculinity http://wfpl.org/post/strange-fruit-boy-scouts-beyonc-and-mark-anthony-neal-black-masculinity <p><strong style="line-height: 1.5;">Society treats Black boys like men, and Black men like animals.&nbsp;</strong></p><p><iframe frameborder="no" height="166" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Ftracks%2F78477660%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-9jPyc&amp;color=b600ff&amp;auto_play=false&amp;show_artwork=false" width="45%"></iframe>That assertion is what stood out to us, and many who were lucky enough to be in the audience last week, for <a href="https://twitter.com/newblackman">Mark Anthony Neal</a>'s lecture at UofL. Dr. Neal is a professor of Black Popular Culture in the Department of African and African-American Studies at Duke University, and he came to Louisville courtesy of our friend Dr. <a href="http://www.rickyljones.com/">Ricky L. Jones</a> and the <a href="http://louisville.edu/panafricanstudies/center-on-race-and-inequality.html">Center for Race and Inequality</a>.&nbsp;</p><p>Dr. Neal's latest book, <a href="http://nyupress.org/books/book-details.aspx?bookId=655#.URXSq0rjlvY">Looking for Leroy: Illegible Black Masculinities</a>, examines depictions of black men in popular culture, and while he was in town, he stopped by our studios to tell us more about his work. Our conversation covered Tiger Woods, Jay-Z, <a href="http://earbender.com/2009/01/05/muddy-waters-comes-to-life-in-cadillac-records/">Muddy Waters</a>, and even <a href="http://www.americanpopularculture.com/journal/articles/spring_2011/gibson.htm">Stringer Bell</a> and <a href="http://www.hiphopdx.com/index/interviews/id.1026/title.michael-k-williams-omar-never-scares">Omar Little</a>, as we tried to make some sense of how pop culture interprets and positions Black masculinity.</p><p> Sat, 09 Feb 2013 15:00:00 +0000 Laura Ellis 3903 at http://wfpl.org Strange Fruit: Boy Scouts, Beyoncé, and Mark Anthony Neal on Black Masculinity