2013-14 Louisville budget http://wfpl.org en Louisville Public Works 'Budget Glitch' for Junk Pickup, Street Sweeping Dismissed http://wfpl.org/post/louisville-public-works-budget-glitch-junk-pickup-street-sweeping-dismissed <p>A plan by the Louisville Metro Council to bring back a pair of junk pickup and street sweepings in the Urban Services District will go forward despite reports that a "budget glitch" made restoration impossible.</p><p>The city used to offer those urban services four times a year within the old city limits, but the cleaning days were cut to two in 2009 as a result of the recession.</p><p>Several <a href="http://wfpl.org/post/louisville-metro-council-prods-mayor-s-office-over-urban-services">council members voiced frustration with Mayor Greg Fischer's administration for not using the budget surplus</a> this year to put those services back. This June, the council allocated $400,000 to restore the pickup and sweeping, but the <a href="http://www.courier-journal.com/article/20130704/NEWS01/307040055/Louisville-may-not-able-bring-more-junk-pickup-days">Public Works Department said last week it could not move the money</a> necessary to follow the council's vote.</p><p>Public Works spokeswoman Lindsay English tells WFPL the department may have spoken too soon.</p><p>"It appeared that there was a technicality, however, that information was incorrect and the money is there," she says. "So now what Public Works is planning to do is review how we can best spend that money to help restore some of those services and investigating what the best way to spend that money will be. And we will be reporting back to Metro Council on a proposal by the end of September." Mon, 08 Jul 2013 16:14:00 +0000 Phillip M. Bailey 6039 at http://wfpl.org Louisville Public Works 'Budget Glitch' for Junk Pickup, Street Sweeping Dismissed Louisville Metro Council Prods Mayor’s Office Over Urban Services http://wfpl.org/post/louisville-metro-council-prods-mayor-s-office-over-urban-services <p>Several Louisville Metro Council members aren't happy with Mayor Greg Fischer for failing to restore previously cut urban services in his new budget proposal.</p><p>City chief financial officer Steve Rowland testified at a budget hearing Monday that the city is investing in key areas such as infrastructure and strategic planning.</p><p>Fischer had been praised for putting additional funds towards fixing the city's roads, for instance.</p><p>But city lawmakers grilled Rowland over why the administration is not using&nbsp; a projected $3.3 million surplus to bring back two rounds of street cleaning and junk pick-up in the Urban Services District that were cut during the recession.</p><p>"It's really hard for me to understand how we continue to implement new programs and spend the taxpayer's dollars when we can't restore services that were in place before merger," says Councilwoman Mary Woolridge, D-3. "It mind boggling to think we can spend $6.4 million to upgrade side walks, roadways and especially bike lanes when we have reduced services in this city. Are we ever going to get money in this budget to restore at least one of these?"</p><p> Tue, 04 Jun 2013 00:21:17 +0000 Phillip M. Bailey 5638 at http://wfpl.org Louisville Metro Council Prods Mayor’s Office Over Urban Services Louisville Metro Budget Hearings to Begin May 29 http://wfpl.org/post/louisville-metro-budget-hearings-begin-may-29 <p>The Louisville Metro Council Budget Committee will begin its review of Mayor Greg Fischer's spending plan next Wednesday.</p><p>The committee has scheduled several hearings over the coming weeks and will review the health department's funding first with the goal of approving the entire budget by June 18.</p><p>Fischer's office will give an overview of revenue, planned projects and operations at a hearing on June 3. The council will also hear from public safety agencies such as the fire, EMS and Metro Police departments.</p><p>"This is the first budget where our revenue picture looks much brighter than in years past," Budget Committee Chairwoman Marianne Butler, D-15, said in a news release.&nbsp; "We have a good working relationship with the mayor and his staff and I do not expect any major surprises as we begin our review."</p><p> Wed, 22 May 2013 14:27:51 +0000 Phillip M. Bailey 5497 at http://wfpl.org Louisville Metro Budget Hearings to Begin May 29 Mayor Greg Fischer's Budget Calls For Public Art Administrator http://wfpl.org/post/mayor-greg-fischers-budget-calls-public-art-administrator <p><span style="line-height: 1.5;">Mayor Greg Fischer has included funds for a new public art administrator in his proposed city budget. The budget, which Mayor Fischer proposed to Metro Council on Monday, adds an additional $30,000 to hire a public art administrator to the $500,000 allocated to the city’s arts fund, which provides funding to external agencies.</span></p><p>The new position falls under the objective Mayor Fischer’s six-year strategic plan labels “investing in people and neighborhoods.”</p> Tue, 21 May 2013 20:06:08 +0000 Erin Keane 5491 at http://wfpl.org Mayor Greg Fischer's Budget Calls For Public Art Administrator Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s Budget Emphasizes Higher Growth, Road Funding http://wfpl.org/post/louisville-mayor-greg-fischer-s-budget-emphasizes-higher-growth-road-funding <p>Presenting the Louisville Metro Council and residents with his third budget, Mayor Greg Fischer unveiled a new spending plan which includes additional funding for the city’s roads and infrastructure.</p><p>The <span id="PageBodyContent"><a href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/142996187/2013-Louisville-Budget-Strategic-Plan" target="_blank">2013-14 budget</a></span> avoids any tax increases, employee layoffs or service cuts due in large part to higher than anticipated revenue and curbs to spending.</p><p>Metro Government has a $528 million general fund and has seen significant budget shortfalls in recent years.</p><p>In the coming fiscal year officials expect a $3.3 million surplus due to the city's occupational tax rising by about 3 percent, a 2.5 percent increase in the insurance premium tax and business profit taxes are expected to increase by 6 percent. The Fischer administration was also able to cut expenditures by not replacing retiring employees, reducing overtime pay by $1.5 million and lowering the structural imbalance by $15 million.</p><p>But one of the chief items the mayor's office is bragging about is putting $6.4 million towards paving roads and creating biking lanes. The city has spent on average $2.5 annually on infrastructure since city-county merger, which is well below the needed $8 to 10 million council members request and others argue the Public Works department requires.</p><p>Fischer says the city still has a financial imbalance and pension obligations, adding officials will have to watch every dollar. But the mayor believes an improved economy has allowed for his administration to make needed infrastructure improvements.</p><p>"There's been a little bit of relief and we have good control on our expenses with cost reductions as well. And that's going to allow us to make some investments that we haven't been able to make in the last couple of years, in particular with some road improvements and more bike lanes," he says. Mon, 20 May 2013 19:55:00 +0000 Phillip M. Bailey 5473 at http://wfpl.org Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer’s Budget Emphasizes Higher Growth, Road Funding