Jack Conway Raises $750,000 Towards Kentucky Governor’s Race

Attorney General Jack Conway has raised more than $750,000 since announcing his campaign for the Democratic nomination for Kentucky governor less than two months ago.

Conway has about $705,000 in cash on hand, according to the campaign’s first report to the state election finance registry. He has donated only $1,000 of his own money to his campaign.

It’s a significant amount in such as short period. Conway is the only Democratic candidate running in the primary so far.

The first report comes off the heels of the campaign receiving endorsements from top Democrats, including U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth.

Conway announced in May that he’d run for governor with state Rep. Sannie Overly, D-Paris. In a released statement, Conway said the campaign’s support has come from Kentuckians who support job growth, new infrastructure and investment in early childhood and higher education.

“We have a proven record of experience and following through on the commitments we’ve made to the people of this state,” Conway said. “We are uniting Democrats and hard-working Kentuckians who believe that together we can build a better commonwealth to live, work and raise our families.”

The Conway campaign said it held two fundraisers after pledging to avoid conflicts with Democratic U.S. Senate nominee Alison Lundergan Grimes and state legislative races.

Meanwhile, Republican Hal Heiner announced he had loaned his campaign $4 million towards his party’s nomination.

Other potential Democratic candidates include former Lt. Gov. Dan Mongiardo and House Speaker Greg Stumbo.

In a released statement, Stumbo said he is still mulling a decision whether to run, while taking a thinly veiled shot at Conway’s early announcement.

“I have not ruled out running, but my priority is raising money for the Democrats who are on the ballot this year, especially my House members and Alison Lundergan Grimes,” he said.

“I will focus on the governor’s race when we get through with these. Personal ambition should never outweigh the bigger picture.”

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