Education

The Kentucky College of Art + Design at Spalding University has a new president.

Moira Scott Payne became president last week after a vote by the executive committee of the KyCAD board of directors. Scott Payne had been serving as the dean of KyCAD since June 15.

Previously, she had served as vice president of academic affairs for Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle. Prior to that, she was director of the Art and Media Program at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee University, Scotland.

Scott Payne is replacing outgoing president, Terry Tyler, who is assuming the role of director of community relations.

“I think I am at the stage in my career where I can afford myself the opportunity to work at a job that is alternative, interesting, exciting,” Scott Payne says. “It wouldn’t be, necessarily, the next step people might have imagined I would take, however I am excited because it brings the opportunity of bringing together everything I have learned in various roles over many years — both here and in Europe.”

She continues: “How many times do we have the the opportunity to build from the ground up? To create a new culture, a new energy and excitement.”

Seeking an experienced leader in art education, KyCAD launched a national search last fall for a new dean to become its chief academic officer. Written into the job description was the expectation that the dean would, in time, take on the role of president. With the move, Scott Payne retains the title of dean as well.

“I am very eager to work closely with Moira as she leads KyCAD into the future,” said Spalding University President Tori Murden McClure, in a news release.

“KyCAD continues to attract an increasing number of students to Spalding and serves a significant void in our community; it’s only a matter of time before KyCAD becomes prominent across the region and country.”

Scott Payne says her first order of business as new president will be an increased focus on strategic planning for the school, which was founded in 2009 by artist and educator Churchill Davenport and several other people.

“We’re waiting for the faculty to come back in after the summer,” she says. “And once they arrive, we’re looking at developing a strategic plan that acknowledges we are here in Louisville — and what does that mean? Who are we as a team? What are our strengths and talents?”

Ashlie Stevens is WFPL's Arts & Culture Reporter.