Kentucky Subcommittee Approves Restraint and Seclusion Policy Change

The Administrative Regulation Review Subcommitee approved the Kentucky Department of Education’s new restraint and seclusion policy proposal Monday.

Kentucky is one of several states that don’t have a state law governing restraint and seclusion in schools so it’s up to KDE to set that policy.

The changes would increase training and parent communication and allow restraint and seclusion of misbehaving students in cases of imminent threats.

Several superintendents testified last month against an earlier version of the policy proposal, saying the language was too vague and didn’t do enough to protect teachers who often must act quickly in behavioral situations.

The education department softened some language governing when a teacher can act, but it still allows for restraint or seclusion in cases of imminent threats. Language was also changed to allow for teachers to act when a student is damaging property. 

Officials with Kentucky Protection and Advocacy—one of several groups pushing for policy changes—previously told WFPL, if approved, the new regulation would be a step in the right direction, but they still wish it was a little stronger.

At Monday’s hearing there was no verbal opposition to the changes, but several spoke in favor of the change, according to Brad Hughes with the Kentucky School Board Association.

The policy will now head to the legislature’s education committee for final approval, which is likely to happen next year.

Devin Katayama

Devin Katayama host middays for WFPL and reports on education and other Louisville issues.

@DevinWFPL

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