Politics

The list of applicants for the vacant District 21 Metro Council seat includes a theater producer, University of Louisville employees and a fire sergeant.

By the 5 p.m. Tuesday deadline, the Metro Council had received 19 applications from South Louisville residents who hope to fill the seat from which Dan Johnson was removed earlier this month following allegations of sexual harassment. Tony Hyatt, spokesman for the council’s majority caucus, said more applications could be in the mail.

Now, the county attorney will review the applicants to make sure they meet the minimum requirements, including verifying their residence within District 21. Next, council president David Yates will call a special meeting in which applicants will appear before the council, one-by-one, to be interviewed.

The Council must choose a replacement within 30 days of the vacancy. In this case, the deadline is Sunday, Dec. 17. Metro Council plans to select and swear in the new District 21 councilmember at the Dec. 14 council meeting, which is also the last meeting of the year, Hyatt said.

“When we’ve done this in the past, they’re more interested with people’s familiarity with the district,” said Hyatt. “They’re interested in what they see as how they want to improve the district. They look at what are your goals for helping people in the district.”

The new representative will serve out the remainder of Johnson’s term, which runs out on Dec. 31, 2018. Since all odd-numbered council seats are up for re-election next year, the replacement would have to run for the seat in order to start a new, four-year term in January 2019. The salary for the position is $47,833.

When the process is complete, this will be the sixth time the Metro Council has filled a vacant seat this way. In one case, a councilmember resigned to take another job; three times, seats were vacated by the passing of their representatives; and there was one prior instance in which a councilmember was removed, Hyatt said.

“Every time that we’ve done this … you take a chance that the person you pick is going to do a good job, and so far everyone that they’ve picked has lived up to what the council wanted to see in the councilperson,” he said.

Here are the 19 known applicants for the District 21 Metro Council seat:

Nikki Boyd, currently a coordinator for health and wellness at Norton Children’s Hospital.

Christopher Brown, who says he has no political background and is concerned with drugs and violence in Louisville.

Scott Davis, the producing director of the Alley Theater.

Greg Dearing, who currently works at a law office. In the early- to mid-1990s, he worked for the Jefferson County Government, and prior to that was a fire sergeant for the City of Louisville.

Chase Gardiner, a behavioral health associate for Norton Children’s Hospital.

Nicole George is a project manager for the University of Louisville and has a website detailing her campaign for the 2018 Metro Council election.

Glenda Granholm, an educator who describes herself as having a “high emotional IQ.”

Amanda Hay, who until recently worked for the Bank of America.

Michael Jupin, a service coordinator at South Oaks Senior Housing.

Vitalis Lanshima, an adjunct professor at Bellarmine University who grew up in Nigeria and was a Paralympic athlete. He says his issues include economic development and creating safe neighborhoods.

Mick Parsons, a podcaster, freelancer writer and editor and English writing instructor.

David Riggs, a retired account manager who worked at Proctor and Gamble and other large companies.

Rhett Sample, the sergeant of the Shively Fire Department.

Jonathan Shane, who has worked at Humana since 2006.

Bret Shultz, a compliance coordinator for Ford who was a horse trainer for 32 years.

Erich Shumake, a pastor who unsuccessfully ran for the District 21 seat in 2014.

Patrick Smith, who works for the University of Louisville Office of Community Engagement.

Kristen Tipton, a regional manager for Southside Christian Child Care and former Humana employee.

Yani Vozos, an adjunct professor for the University of Louisville Department of Urban and Public Affairs, and director and bandleader of the Appalatin Music Ensemble.

Amina Elahi is WFPL's City Reporter.