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Local News
8:30 am
Fri October 26, 2012

New York Times editorial takes aim at Kentucky death penalty

The New York Times editorial board is joining the calls for Kentucky to end the death penalty.

In an editorial published this week, The Times said:

The death penalty in Kentucky is colossally unfair, costly and riddled with constitutional error. From 1976 through last year, of the 78 people sentenced to death in the state, 50 had their sentences overturned on appeal, with 15 of those for prosecutorial mistakes or misconduct.

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Politics
8:30 am
Fri October 26, 2012

Yoder Aims First TV Ad at Safeguarding Entitlements

Democrat Shelli Yoder is launching her first TV ad of the general election in Indiana's Ninth Congressional District race that touts the political newcomer as a champion for middle-class Hoosiers.

The 30-second spot features Yoder talking directly to voters and pledging to protect entitlement programs.

Yoder goes after Republican incumbent Todd Young, accusing the freshman of backing a plan to privatize Social Security and turn Medicare into a voucher program. Presumably, Yoder is talking about Young's support of GOP vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan's budget plan.

Check it out:

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Arts and Humanities
6:31 am
Fri October 26, 2012

Excerpt: 'Beam, Straight Up' by Fred Noe

Arts and Humanities
6:30 am
Fri October 26, 2012

Jim Beam's Great-Grandson Reflects on Rise to Master Distiller in New Book

  • Fred Noe talks to WFPL's Rick Howlett about his new book, 'Straight Up: The Bold Story of the First Family of Bourbon."

One of the most prominent names associated with Kentucky bourbon is Beam.

The Beam family began making whiskey in 1795, but it was Jim Beam who put the product on the map, building the brand bearing his name after Prohibition.

Today, Jim Beam bourbon and the company’s other varieties of spirits are among the most popular in the world.

Jim Beam’s great-grandson, Fred Noe, has documented the colorful history of the family business and his rise from bottling line worker to Jim Beam master distiller.

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Education
8:09 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Jeffersonville Principal, JCPS Board Candidate Reassigned After Paid Leave

Jeffersonville High School principal James Sexton has been assigned to lead Clark County Middle/High School after being put on paid administrative leave last week for reasons that were never publicly disclosed.

Sexton is also running for Jefferson County Board of Education's District 7 seat.

Greater Clark County Schools released the following statement Thursday night:

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Politics
6:32 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Mourdock Rips Donnelly Over DSCC Ad

Indiana Republican Senate nominee Richard Mourdock is blasting Democratic candidate Joe Donnelly for a blistering ad released by the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee on Thursday afternoon.

The spot goes after Mourdock's controversial comments about rape pregnancies, and demands he apologize for the remarks. A day after, Mourdock said his words were inarticulate and said he was sorry if people misinterpreted them.

Watch:

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Politics
4:37 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Lawsuit Seeks to Remove State Senate Candidate Chris Thieneman from Ballot

A lawsuit filed in Jefferson Circuit Court seeks to kick Republican state Senate candidate Chris Thieneman off the ballot, citing residency issues.

Thieneman is a Louisville businessman and political activist who is running against Democratic incumbent Perry Clark for 37th State Senate District seat.

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Politics
4:37 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Document: Motion to Disqualify Chris Thieneman from State Senate Race

A motion has been filed in Jefferson Circuit Court to disqualify state senate candidate Chris Thieneman. Read it here.

Arts and Humanities
4:11 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Justin Torres to Read from Acclaimed Debut Novel

Gregory Crowley

Updated: Tonight's reading at 21C has been canceled due to Hurricane Sandy-related flight cancelations. Sarabande Books is working on rescheduling the event for 2013.

Justin Torres' surprising and haunting debut novel "We the Animals" introduces us to three near-feral brothers and their young parents, a white mother and Puerto Rican father from Brooklyn who marry when the mother is only 14 and pregnant with the oldest boy. They move to a small town in upstate New York, where they are outsiders even among the other poor families, and struggle against the limitations of their poverty, lack of education and youth.

“They’re these city kids, this mixed-race couple, in this tiny little town,” says Torres. “There aren’t many supporting characters in this book. There are the boys, and there’s Ma and Paps, and it’s very essential in that way. I wanted it to be, to emphasize the claustrophobia of the family, how much they rely on each other and how much they can’t escape each other.”

(Read an excerpt of "We the Animals.")

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Arts and Humanities
4:03 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Excerpt: 'We the Animals' by Justin Torres

"We the Animals," by Justin Torres

Excerpt from Justin Torres' new novel, We the Animals.

"Never-Never Time"

We all three sat at the kitchen table in our raincoats, and Joel smashed tomatoes with a small rubber mallet. We had seen it on TV: a man with an untamed mustache and a mallet slaughtering vegetables, and people in clear plastic ponchos soaking up the mess, having the time of their lives. We aimed to smile like that. We felt the pop and smack of tomato guts exploding; the guts dripped down the walls and landed on our cheeks and foreheads and congealed in our hair. When we ran out of to­matoes, we went into the bathroom and pulled out tubes of our mother’s lotions from under the sink. We took off our raincoats and positioned ourselves so that when the mallet slammed down and forced out the white cream, it would get everywhere, the creases of our shut-tight eyes and the folds of our ears.

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