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Arts and Humanities
4:25 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Moderately Successful Poet, Jeffrey Skinner

Erin Keane

Jeffrey Skinner, formerly a private investigator, is the author of five books of poetry, most recently Salt Water Amnesia (2005), and two anthologies of poems, Last Call: Poems on Alcoholism, Addiction, and Deliverance; and Passing the Word: Poets and Their Mentors.

He recently penned The 6.5 Practices of Moderately Successful Poets: A Self-Help Memoir for Sarabande Books.

Local News
4:24 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Drought Devastates Kentucky Corn Crop

The hot, dry summer has taken a toll on Kentucky's corn crop, which could result in the lowest yields in nearly 30 years.

A government report issued Friday predicts an average statewide corn yield of 65 bushels an acre. That's down 74 bushels from last year's crop. And it would be the lowest yield since the 1983 crop produced 48 bushels per acre.

Corn production in Kentucky is forecast at nearly 97 million bushels, down 46 percent from last year.

Local News
2:03 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Veterinarians Will Be Watching for Swine Flu at Kentucky State Fair

Veterinarians will be watching for evidence of swine flu during this year's Kentucky State Fair as health officials nationwide have reported a five-fold increase of a new strain of the flu that spreads from pigs to people.

State veterinarians will staff the swine pavilion and visually inspect all swine. Animals that are coughing, sneezing or have labored breathing will be isolated and tested.

Fair Board President Harold Workman says the fair is prepared for the slightest sign of an outbreak and the public will be notified immediately if swine flu is found.

Local News
1:09 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Ky Judge Lifts Stay for Bridges Project Case

Ohio River Bridges Project

A federal judge is allowing a case challenging the Ohio River Bridges Project to move forward.

In 2009, River Fields and the National Trust for Historic Preservation filed suit against the Federal Highway Administration. They argued the federal government did not practice due diligence in preparing environmental impact statements and several historical places could be affected by the project.

Western District of Kentucky Judge John G. Heyburn put a stay on the suit in 2010 while bi-state officials reworked the $2.6 billion bridges proposal.

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Environment
12:02 pm
Fri August 10, 2012

Whitfield Chosen to Help Craft GOP Policy on Energy, Environment

First District Congressman Ed Whitfield has been tapped to lead a subcommittee at the Republican National Convention later this month, where he’ll help shape the Republican party’s stance on energy issues.

Whitfield is the chairman of the House Subcommittee on Energy and Power. During his time in that position, he’s lead efforts to keep the uranium enrichment plant in Paducah open and stop the federal government from regulating coal ash.

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Education
11:18 am
Fri August 10, 2012

Kentucky Education Board Clarifies Restraint, Seclusion Policy

The Kentucky Board of Education has approved regulations strengthening its policies around restraining misbehaving students.

Over the past several years, officials have considered changing the state's education department policies. Several states have laws on the books that regulate restraint. Kentucky is not among them, leaving the education department to set regulations on restraining students.

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Politics
11:09 am
Fri August 10, 2012

AWOL Soldier Sentenced to Life for Bomb Plot

An AWOL soldier from Fort Campbell, Kentucky who was convicted of planning to blow up a restaurant full of Fort Hood troops has been sentenced to life in prison by a federal judge in Texas.

PFC Naser Abdo received the punishment today (Friday) in Waco.

Abdo told authorities he planned to make bombs as part of a "massive attack" against Fort Hood soldiers last year. He was convicted in May on six federal charges, including attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction.

The 22-year-old represented himself at the sentencing.

Politics
7:26 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Council Overrides Fischer Landmarks Veto

In a historic vote, the Louisville Metro Council rejected Mayor Greg Fischer’s veto of the landmarks ordinance by an 18-to-7 vote.

The legislation was aimed at changing several provisions of the way the city designates historic sites and structures. Among the amendments was a change to allow a majority of council members to halt a decision made by the Landmarks Commission for further review.

The mayoral veto was the second in Fischer's administration, and was the first to be rejected by the council since city and county governments merged.

For months, council members held public forums and debated the measure until it passed last week. But Fischer vetoed the bill at the urging of preservationists, who argued the amendments favor developers and endanger the city's heritage. In a letter to city lawmakers, the mayor said council members were overstepping their bounds and politicizing the process.

Councilman Kelly Downard, R-16, voted for the ordinance and stood against the veto. He says the mayor admitted there were problems in the landmarks process and the council needed to step in due to a lack of oversight.

"We’re being told that the fabric of our heritage will be permanently diminished by providing oversight by this council. However, a review of the facts makes this seem a bit of a contradiction," he says. "Even the mayor in his veto message admits the Bauer site might have been a mistake. Oversight was needed, but it wasn’t there."

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Science
4:02 pm
Thu August 9, 2012

Perseid Meteor Shower To Peak This Weekend

Photographer Jeff Berkes caught this Perseid meteor over Dead Horse Point State Park, Utah, on July 30, 2011. From space.com.

The peak viewing period for the annual Perseid meteor shower occurs this weekend.    Dozens of meteors may be visible to the naked eye at certain times.    They're the result of Earth passing through a debris field from the Swift-Tuttle comet.

Eastern Kentucky University physics professor Marco Ciocca says it’s not the only time meteors and other space material make their mark over Kentucky.  

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