Jeff Lunden is a freelance arts reporter and producer whose stories have been heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered and Weekend Edition, as well as on other public radio programs.

Education
10:00 am
Wed October 2, 2013

WFPL Forum: What 'Career Ready' Means for Students and the Role of Private Business

Credit Courtesy of JCPS' 5 Star School book.

Kentucky leads the nation in implementing college and career ready standards. 

This has been touted by state educators for the past few years since Senate Bill 1 in 2009 forced the education system to adapt and meet the demand of Kentucky's changing economic realities.

The shift has also meant a change in programs and partnerships between the public education system and the private sector.

What is the best use of business now? And what does a career-ready student look like here in Kentucky, and across the country?

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Wed October 2, 2013

'Filmmakers Need to Get Organized': Symposium Assesses State of Film in Kentucky

Credit Shutterstock.com

When Appalshop, the Whitesburg, Ky.-based media arts center, was founded in 1969, filmmaking wasn’t cheap. Cameras cost upwards of $30,000, and film stock and processing could run about $500 to get ten minutes of film. And although Lyndon Johnson’s War on Poverty had shined a national spotlight on Appalachia, few films were made by locals. Appalshop, which was founded in part to train young Appalachians in film and television production, changed that.

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The Two-Way
6:43 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Treasury Secretary Warns Congress Of Next Looming Crisis

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 8:48 pm

As if Congress needed another problem to solve, Treasury Secretary Jack Lew sent congressional leaders a letter reminding them that in a little more than two weeks, they have another looming deadline that is just as serious — if not more so — than the shutdown they're dealing with now.

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Local News
6:37 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Kentucky's Online Health Insurance Exchange Gets 2,902 Completed Applications on Day 1

Credit Shutterstock.com

Into its first evening Tuesday, 2,902 Kentuckians had completed applications through the state's online health insurance exchange and 4,691 applications were started, Gov. Steve Beshear said via Twitter.

Also, 35 small business owners (businesses with 25 or fewer employees can get tax credits) had begun the application process, the governor Tweeted. By 7 p.m., about 78,000 people had logged onto the online health insurance exchange, called kynect. 

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All Tech Considered
6:34 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Tech Problems Plague First Day Of Health Exchange Rollout

Heavy Internet traffic and system problems plagued the launch of the new health insurance exchanges on Tuesday.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 10:35 am

Many Americans got "please wait" messages Tuesday when they tried to start shopping for health coverage on the federal government's new health insurance website, healthcare.gov. A series of technological glitches, delays and crashes kept people from getting to several of the 16 state exchanges, too.

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Local News
8:21 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Kentucky Defends Same-Sex Marriage Ban

Kentucky's attorney general's office says the state's same-sex marriage ban should stand but acknowledge overturning it would grant gay couples the same legal protections as straight couples.

The state made its defense of the ban in response to a lawsuit brought by Gregory Bourke and Michael De Leon of Louisville, who were married in Canada nine years ago. The men filed suit in July to force the state to recognize valid unions from other states and countries.

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Local News
7:00 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Despite Furloughs, Basic Services and Troops Still Active at Kentucky Posts After Shutdown

Credit Creative Commons

FORT KNOX — Officials at Kentucky's two major Army posts say basic services such as utilities, public safety and hospital emergency services were still functioning despite a partial government shutdown.

Fort Knox Garrison Commander Col. T.J. Edwards says some civilian employees have received furlough notices, but soldiers and other essential personnel were still on duty.

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Education
4:30 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Louisville Gets Federal Grant For Armed Officer Protection At More JCPS Schools

Credit Shutterstock.com

Louisville has received a federal grant to help pay for more school resource officers in Jefferson County Public Schools—and city officials say for the first time an elementary school will receive the added protection.

The school resource officer job gained heightened awareness after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Conn.

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Politics
2:59 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer Blames 'Extreme' GOP Wing for Government Shutdown

Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer

Calling it Washington, D.C., "silliness," Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer is blaming the government shutdown on a faction in the Republican Party, which he argues is holding the country hostage.

The mayor's comments come as federal lawmakers appear to be further entrenched in their positions.

Congress failed to reach a budget deal on Monday to finance the government and certain services.

Earlier Tuesday, the Senate rejected the latest House effort to hold a conference ,and no meetings between President Obama and congressional leaders have been set.

Fischer, a Democrat, joined a chorus of elected officials outside of Washington who are scolding lawmakers over the shutdown and its possible effects on state and local governments.

"If there’s a prolonged shutdown that’s going to affect the confidence of people and that’s not going to be good for business. We do not need to go back into another recession because of this silliness that’s going on in Washington, D.C. right now where people can’t come together on agreement," he says.

This shutdown is the first in nearly two decades, and its biggest impact thus far is the furloughing of around 800,000 federal employees across the country. As of 2011, approximately 9,000 federal employees were working in Louisville, but not all of them will be furloughed if they’re considered essential personnel.

A number of monuments and agencies have already announced their closures, such as the Library of Congress and National Zoo with more expected this week.

In the first day of the shutdown, many lawmakers spent the day trying to avoid taking the political blame.

Speaking on the Senate Tuesday, Republican Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky once again criticized Democrats for killing the fourth measure out of the GOP-controlled House.

"They’ve now said they won’t even agree to sit down and work out our differences. They won’t even talk about it. They literally just voted against working out a compromise," he says.

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