Local News
7:00 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Louisville Cardinals Coach Jeff Walz: 'Our Ultimate Goal is to Win a National Championship'

Jeff Walz
Credit file photo/Creative Commons

The Louisville Cardinals women's basketball team is the surprise of women's basketball—but Coach Jeff Walz tells WFPL that they have no intention of being satisfied with a Final Four banner.

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Local News
11:00 pm
Sat April 6, 2013

Photos | Louisville Cardinals Fans Celebrate Win Over Wichita State

Credit Joseph Lord/WFPL

The Louisville Cardinals men's basketball team advanced to the national championship game on Saturday night after defeating the Wichita State Shockers.

And, as expected, fans took to the streets throughout the city to celebrate.

The Cardinal Towne development was quickly flooded with students and fans after the game.

Here's what it looked like:

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Local News
8:38 pm
Sat April 6, 2013

Louisville Cardinals Advance to National Championship Game

The Louisville Cardinals advanced Saturday evening to the NCAA Tournament championship game, but not before getting a scare from the Wichita State Shockers.

The overall No. 1-seeded Cardinals trailed by a point at halftime and through most of the second half to the No. 9 seed Shockers, but managed to come back as the game closed.

The Cardinals won 72-68.

Russ Smith led UofL with 21 points.

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Strange Fruit
11:48 am
Sat April 6, 2013

Strange Fruit: A Look at the Transatlantic Slave Trade through "Spirits of the Passage" Exhibit

"He looked at me and smiled and put his hand in the sand, and put some sand into my hand. I didn't think much about it. And I looked at it, and it was full of trade beads. It was  full of the beads that were actually traded for people."

Even after studying it for years, Madeleine Burnside says the reality and magnitude of the Transatlantic Slave trade hit her in this moment, at the bottom of the ocean, exploring the shipwreck site of the Henrietta Marie. Dr. Burnside is the Executive Director of the Frazier History Museum, and she curated their current original exhibit, Spirits of the Passage

Dr. Burnside has studied the history of the slave trade for the last twenty years. "It's one of those subjects that when you start at all, it will not let you go," she says. For her, the story begins once you get past the horrific (but dry) statistics you learn in school. "You start to think about maybe just 200 people on a ship," she explains. "You start to imagine that you know these people as individuals, and I really sort of started to feel a really big responsibility to tell that story."

This week we went to see the exhibit, then sat down for a chat with Dr. Burnside about putting it all together. She says for her, it's not about the past at all (strange words coming from a historian!). "There's only one reason to study history, and that's to understand the future, not the past." To that point, she draws comparisons between the rebellion and resistance of enslaved Africans straight through to the struggles we still face today. "There's Civil Rights, there's women's rights, there's gay and lesbian rights, and then there's ADA. All of those people really built on Civil Rights and that struggle. And the 1960s struggle comes out of the 1860s struggle comes out of the 1760s struggle."

  One disturbing part of the exhibit is a collection of shackles that were used on enslaved people during transport. Within this case, among the battered-looking metal ankle and wrist restraints, is one very tiny set of shackles that could have only been used on a very small woman or on a child. But even this somewhat heart-wrenching artifact points to a strength of spirit. "There's no reason to restrain someone who doesn't fight," Dr. Burnside points out. "These people fought back."

While at the museum, we also ran into friend to the show Brian Lee West (you might remember him from our conversation about his work in the play Top Dog/Underdog). For the Spirits of the Passage Exhibit, he portrays Olaudah Equiano, a Nigerian man who was captured as a child and sold into slavery. Brian tells us the story of Equiano's life and the amazing series of events that lead to his eventual freedom and authorship of The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Olaudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vassa, the African, a major work among North American slave narratives.

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The Two-Way
9:42 am
Sat April 6, 2013

Former Employee, Who Leaked Rutgers Abuse Video, Files Whistle-Blower Lawsuit

Eric Murdock as a Los Angeles Clipper in 1999.
Tom Hauck Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 8:48 pm

Eric Murdock, the Rutgers University employee who leaked video of coach Mike Rice physically and verbally abusing his players, filed a whistle-blower lawsuit against the university on Friday.

In the complaint, filed a New Jersey state court, Murdock alleges he told the school's athletic director Tim Pernetti about Rice's abusive behavior "on several occasions."

Instead of taking action against Rice, the complaint says, Murdock was fired.

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Economy
7:13 am
Sat April 6, 2013

Sequester Pinches Long-Term Unemployed Even More

A crowd of jobseekers attends a health care job fair on Thursday in New York.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

Almost 5 million Americans are considered long-term unemployed, meaning they have been searching for work for at least six months.

This week, their plight is getting a bit tougher as the government cuts their unemployment benefits — part of the automatic reductions in federal spending that took effect recently.

On a recent day, about 40 people turned out at a Manhattan jobs center run by the New York Labor Department to get advice on looking for work. These are all people who have been out of work for at least 27 weeks.

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Jim Zarroli is a business reporter for NPR News, based at NPR's New York bureau.

He covers economics and business news including fiscal policy, the Federal Reserve, the job market and taxes

Over the years, he's reported on recessions and booms, crashes and rallies, and a long string of tax dodgers, insider traders and Ponzi schemers. He's been heavily involved in the coverage of the European debt crisis and the bank bailouts in the United States.

Sports
7:11 am
Sat April 6, 2013

Always In The Zone, Syracuse Is Hard To Beat

Syracuse celebrates after the team's 55-39 win over Marquette, in Washington last Saturday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 11:08 am

Any recreational league basketball team, any police athletic league squad and every group of 8-year-olds who wear the same uniform are, on the first or second day of practice, introduced to the 2-3 zone defense.

The coach will say, "On defense, you two short guys stay near the foul line, and you three bigger kids, you go down near the basket. Put your hands up, and you're now playing the 2-3."

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Local News
7:00 am
Sat April 6, 2013

Louisville Cardinals' Rick Pitino: 'Wichita State Can Beat Us'

Rick Pitino
Credit Creative Commons

Despite being the favorites to win the men’s basketball national championship, Coach Rick Pitino says his Louisville Cardinals face a tough challenge Saturday.

The Cardinals are the NCAA Tournament’s overall No. 1 seed. Pitino says he’s watched their opponent, the No. 9 seeded Wichita State Shockers, and is convinced that they’re underrated.

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It's All Politics
5:56 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Obama Riles His Own Party With Social Security Offer

President Obama prepares to depart San Francisco on Thursday.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:11 pm

Few things indicate a president no longer needs to worry about re-election more than his willingness to ignite an intraparty firestorm.

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