The Two-Way
10:45 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Deja Vu All Over Again As 'Sequester' Deadline Looms

The White House: When night falls, it looks like the "sequester" will arrive.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 11:55 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Ari Shapiro reports

Update at 11:55 a.m. ET. As Expected, No Deal:

President Obama and Congressional leaders met at the White House Friday morning and, just as pundits predicted, they could not reach a deal to avert the $85 billion in automatic spending cuts set to begin at the end of the day. We've posted on that news:

Decrying 'Dumb, Arbitrary Cuts,' Obama Says 'We Will Get Through This'

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Local News
10:30 am
Fri March 1, 2013

On Byline Today: Appalachian Prisons, Hemp, Charter Schools and the Humana Festival Begins

Prisons in Appalachia, developments in the efforts to bring industrial hemp and charter schools to Kentucky and the Humana Festival gets going—these topics and more will be discussed this afternoon on Byline.

Sylvia Ryerson of WMMT radio in Whitesburg, Ky., discusses her story on how some Appalachian communities are second-guessing their decisions to recruit prisons into their areas, because the promised jobs and benefits haven't materialized.

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Shots - Health News
8:41 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Sacrificing Sleep Makes For Run-Down Teens — And Parents

Napping in class may be common, but it's also a sign that kids need more sleep.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 8:00 am

When NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health asked parents and caregivers in our new poll whether getting a good night's sleep is important, families overwhelmingly told us that sleep is a high priority.

But almost all said that it's difficult to pull off. And studies suggest this is especially true for teenagers.

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Sports
7:06 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Pete Rose: A Living Legend, Off The Record

Pete Rose holds the record for all-time hits, but he was banned from baseball in 1989 for gambling on the game. Now, his records — but not his name — appear on Topps baseball cards.
Otto Greule Jr Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 28, 2013 9:04 pm

As baseball emerges from its winter hibernation, one of the game's greatest and most controversial figures, Pete Rose, is back in the news.

The all-time hits leader has been banned from baseball since 1989 for gambling on the game.

It appears fallout continues: A new batch of Topps baseball cards lists some of his many records, but not his name. It's a reminder of Rose's singular status as a Major League Baseball pariah. It also raises the question, with so much bad behavior by top athletes, is it time to re-evaluate Rose's status?

The Art Of Pete

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Tom Goldman is NPR's sports correspondent. His reports can be heard throughout NPR's news programming, including Morning Edition and All Things Considered, and NPR.org.

With a beat covering the entire world of professional sports, both in and outside of the United States, Goldman reporting covers the broad spectrum of athletics from the people to the business of athletics.

During his more than 20 years with NPR, Goldman has covered every major athletic competition including the Super Bowl, the World Series, the NBA Finals, golf and tennis championships, and the Olympic Games.

The Two-Way
7:05 am
Fri March 1, 2013

The Pope Emeritus' New Shoes And The Mexican Man Who Makes Them

Armando Martin Dueñas shows replicas of the hand-crafted loafers given to Pope Benedict XVI.
Alfredo Valadez AP

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 8:42 am

As Pope Benedict XVI left the Vatican and his papacy, he slipped out of his trademark red shoes and put on a pair of Mexican leather loafers. The shoes, actually three pairs, two burgundy and one brown, were a gift to the Pope during his trip last year to Mexico.

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Carrie Kahn is NPR's international correspondent based in Mexico City, Mexico. She covers Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Prior to her post in Mexico Kahn had been a National Correspondent based in Los Angeles since joining NPR in 2003. During that time Kahn often reported on and from Mexico, most recently covering the country's presidential election in 2012. She was the first NPR reporter into Haiti after the devastating earthquake in early 2010, and has returned to the country six times in the two years since to detail recovery and relief efforts, and the political climate.

Law
7:04 am
Fri March 1, 2013

Administration Asks Supreme Court To End Calif. Gay-Marriage Ban

Originally published on Fri March 1, 2013 8:47 am

The Obama administration has filed a friend of the court brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down California's ban on gay marriage as a denial of "equal protection under the law." But the brief does not call for the abolition of all state bans on same-sex marriage.

The case now before the high court tests the constitutionality of California's Proposition 8, a referendum narrowly passed by voters in 2008 that reinstituted a ban on gay marriage.

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Politics
6:00 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

Pension Fixes in Limbo As Leaders Argue Over Approaches

Greg Stumbo
Credit Kentucky Legislative Commission

 A House bill aiming to help generate revenues for the underfunded pension system is in legal limbo as the Senate refused to accept the bill.

House Bill 416 takes revenues from expansion of Instant Racing and online lottery sales and the start of a Keno game to generate close to $100 million a year to pay into state's currently underfunded pensions for state employees.

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Education
5:17 pm
Thu February 28, 2013

Charter School Advocates Rally in Frankfort

Credit File photo

FRANKFORT — Supporters of charter schools in Kentucky rallied Thursday at the Capitol Rotunda as a bill in the General Assembly makes its way through the legislative process. 

“I feel like the education isn’t good and they’re just warehousing kids to be on the streets, sort of like a daycare for kids.  We not getting any education, and I feel like a charter school would help that,” said James Yarbrough, a student at a school classified by the state as low-achieving and one of the rally participants.

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