Politics
1:06 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

C-FAIR Makes Endorsements

The political arm of the Fairness Campaign, C-FAIR, has made its endorsements for school board, Metro Council, General Assembly and judicial races.

In Metro Council races, the PAC supports incumbent Democratic councilmen Tom Owen, Rick Blackwell and Brent Ackerson and favors Democratic challenger Teague Ridge in District 18 against Tea Party favorite Marilyn Parker, who beat incumbent Jon Ackerson in the Republican primary in May. 

"Jon was a good ally," says C-FAIR board member and director of the Fairness Campaign Chris Hartman, "and we were sorry to lose him."

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Environment
12:22 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Regulators Grant Mercury Variance for Ohio River Plant

Ohio River regulators have voted unanimously to allow a West Virginia company five more years to comply with new, more stringent pollution requirements.

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Education
11:29 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Richmond Wonders: Are We a University Community or a Community With a University?

The presidential search committee for Eastern Kentucky University has been established.

Current President Doug Whitlock will retire next summer. Former State Senator and Richmond City Manager Ed Worley will serve on the eleven-member committee. He says it's important to find a president who is comfortable with business and academia.

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Media
10:43 am
Thu October 11, 2012

Advice For Moderators: Keep Order, Out Of Spotlight

Moderator Jim Lehrer gestures before the presidential debate at the University of Denver last week. Moderators must finagle answers out of sometimes-dodgy politicians and keep control, all without seeming to get in the way.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 7:58 am

PBS' Jim Lehrer came in for widespread criticism last week for failing to control the first presidential debate. Now, moderator Martha Raddatz is confronting partisan criticism in the lead-up to Thursday night's vice presidential debate, the first and only direct confrontation between Republican Paul Ryan and Democrat Joe Biden.

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Geraldo Rivera of the Fox News Channel once described David Folkenflik as "a really weak-kneed, backstabbing, sweaty-palmed reporter." Others have been kinder. The Columbia Journalism Review, for example, gave him a "laurel" for his reporting that immediately led the U.S. military to institute safety measures for journalists in Baghdad.

Environment
9:00 am
Thu October 11, 2012

What Will it Take to Make Western Kentucky Aluminum Smelters Profitable?

The smokestack of an aluminum smelting plant, 1973.
Doug Wilson Environmental Protection Agency

Over the past several months, there have been worries that two big aluminum smelters in western Kentucky will shut down. Rio Tinto-Alcan has a plant in Sebree (Webster County) and Century Aluminum has a plant in Hawesville (Hancock County).

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Arts and Humanities
6:00 am
Thu October 11, 2012

The Big Break: Epiphanies

  • This week, Claire Horrocks (Louisville Ballet) experiences her first full company ballet ("Lady of the Camellias") and realizes it's not always about dancing, while Samantha Beach (Actors Theatre of Louisville) thinks about forming good artistic habits sooner rather than later. Meanwhile, Brad Raymond (Kentucky Opera) reflects on his role in "The Prodigal Son."

This week on our new audio diary series “The Big Break,” Louisville Ballet trainee Claire Horrocks experiences her first full production, while Actors Theatre apprentice Samantha Beach tries to figure out how to set good artistic habits for her future. Kentucky Opera studio artist Brad Raymond reflects on his most recent show, "The Prodigal Son."

Learn more about our audio diarists, who report in every Thursday about what it's like to work in a professional performing arts company.

Every season, performing arts companies take on a group of young up-and-comers who will work, and learn, with the pros. The Louisville Ballet calls them trainees.

Environment
5:10 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

New Solid Waste Plan Could Include Plastic Bag Ban, Food Waste Pickup

Louisville’s solid waste board is set to vote on the city’s five-year plan at the end of this month. If it passes, residents could see changes in how their trash is handled and recycled.

The plan includes three big ideas: banning plastic bags for use with yard waste, allowing citizens to place food scraps at the curb for composting and setting hard limits on how much trash can be thrown out—and charging extra for more trash.

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Arts and Humanities
5:01 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

Kentucky Author Revisits Lost Colony Mystery in Debut Novel

Gwenda Bond’s debut young adult novel “Blackwood” (Strange Chemistry) revisits one of America’s most enduring mysteries. On modern-day Roanoke Island, 114 people disappear – the same number that vanished from the island's lost colony in the 16th century. Two misfit teens, Miranda (daughter of the town drunk) and Phillips (who hears the voices of the dead) team up to solve both mysteries in order to bring back their missing neighbors.

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