Noise and Notes: Braden’s Southern Patriotism and The Values of Hip-Hop Politcs

A new documentary on the late civil rights icon Anne Braden is coming out.

The Louisville social justice advocate died in 2006 at the age of 81 and dedicated her life to civil rights. Braden gained notoriety as an affluent southern white woman who led many campaigns against Jim Crow laws at the height of segregation.

Check out the trailer:

I talked with Braden biographer and historian Cate Fosl, who is the director of the Anne Braden Institute at the University of Louisville. We talked about Braden’s legacy, the new film and if her brand of social justice still matters in a so-called post-racial America.

Recently a group of Louisville hip-hop artists and others came together for an activism workshop at Sullivan University. The aim was to look at the historical relationship between the history of the genre and grassroots efforts, which has many believing that hip-hop politics is making a comeback locally.

But critics remain doubtful that the music is more than entertainment and others question if a youth genre more associated with spruced up cars, flashy jewelry and booty music has much to do with politics.

For this discussion, hip-hop duo Cypher Divine and LEO Weekly music critic Damien McPherson talked about the ongoing debate over the genre’s message.

This was also the focus of an international debate at a recent Google Versus forum, which was ironically dubbed “hip-hop on trial.”

Check it:

Comments