Devin Katayama

Midday Host/Education Reporter

Devin Katayama is an award-winning journalist who hosts the midday for WFPL Louisville Public Media. He's also the station's education reporter.

Devin earned his M.A. in Journalism from Columbia College Chicago where he was a Follet Fellow. While in Chicago, he won the Studs Terkel Community Media Workshop Scholarship award for his stories on street youth. 

Devin previously worked with WBEZ Chicago Public Media’s Worldview program and with Northern California KQED’s The California Report. He earned his B.A. in English Creative Writing at CUNY Hunter College in New York City. 

For more of his work, check out audiocollected.org.

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Education
1:06 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

Funding Cuts, Changing Needs Blamed for 41 JCPS Teacher Layoffs

Credit File photo

Jefferson County Public Schools will lay off 41 teachers next school year, half of whom teach special education. 

JCPS officials say state budget and federal sequester cuts are partly the reason for the layoffs, but they also say fewer students are using special education services. 

The state required school districts to submit their layoff lists on May 15.

JCPS' list included 20 Exceptional Child Education (special education) teachers, 11 English teachers, seven physical education teachers and one art teacher. 

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Education
1:32 pm
Wed May 15, 2013

Kentucky Adult Education Offering Free GED Testing

Credit Casey Serin/Creative Commons

Over the next few weeks, the state is offering free GED testing to eligible Kentucky residents .

The GED Testing Service hasn’t updated the high school equivalency exam in nearly a decade. Beginning in January 2014, the new test will be more closely aligned with the common core standards many states have already adopted. The testing fee will also double to $120.

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Education
11:23 am
Wed May 15, 2013

In-State Tuition Agreement Means More Cash, Students for Indiana Colleges

Credit Shutterstock.com

Following up with yesterday's story on the reciprocity agreement between Indiana and Kentucky, the Council on Postsecondary Education has provided estimated gross tuition comparisons for how the two states fare in the agreement.

A reciprocity agreement allows students living closer to an out-of-state institution a chance to attend that school for the in-state student cost. Colleges and universities can choose whether to participate in Kentucky.

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Education
5:08 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

After Christian Group Meeting, JCPS Principals Reminded to Remain 'Neutral' on Religion

Credit File photo

Jefferson County Public School Superintendent Donna Hargens sent a memo to all principals reminding them that district employees must remain neutral when discussing religion in school.

Last week, the group Louisville Area Christian Educators, or LACES, held an evening meeting at a district facility where a JCPS principal reportedly discussed ways religion could be introduced to students. Some have raised concerns with the group’s use of a public school facility to deliver their message.

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Education
4:30 pm
Tue May 14, 2013

Kentuckians Use In-State Tuition Agreement More Than Hoosiers

Credit Shutterstock.com

More Kentucky students attend Indiana colleges and universities where they can get in-state tuition than the other way around.

Kentucky and Indiana officials have announced that they're extending the agreement that allows students to pay in-state tuition at certain colleges and universities across the Ohio River. The extension was approved by the two states' higher education agencies as its expiration date approached this summer.

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Education
11:34 pm
Mon May 13, 2013

CLOUT Group Pushes JCPS to Change Disciplinary Policy for Students

Credit cloutky.org

Several members of the Louisville faith-based group Citizens of Louisville Organized and United Together, or CLOUT, are continuing their push for changes to Jefferson County Public Schools' discipline policy.  

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Education
6:27 am
Mon May 13, 2013

JCPS Suspensions Down; Struggle for African-American Students Continues

Data provided by JCPS

Overall suspensions are down in Jefferson County Public Schools this academic year, but the district is still struggling with one major at-risk student group.

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Local News
6:25 am
Mon May 13, 2013

Downtown Louisville Markers Celebrate Louisville Civil Rights Events

J. Blaine Hudson
Credit University of Louisville

Louisville will install the first of a dozen markers this week to note significant civil rights events and celebrate the 50th anniversary of the passage of the city’s Public Accommodations Ordinance. 

The idea was started by the late University of Louisville professor Blaine Hudson in 2011. The inaugural sign installed on Tuesday at 3:30 on Fourth and Guthrie streets will note local demonstrations and acts that led to the ordinance, which outlawed discriminatory practices in the city.

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Education
4:41 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Spalding University Announces New Third Street Republic Bank Academic Center

The Cosmopolitan Building is located at 981 Third Street.
Credit Courtesy of Spalding University

Officials with Spalding University have announced plans to expand the campus after purchasing the Cosmopolitan Building in downtown Louisville.

Once renovations are complete the building will be renamed the Republic Bank Academic Center.

Spalding president Tori Murden McClure says the bank met the school nearly halfway to help pay the $700,000 purchase cost.

“We couldn’t afford the full purchase price and they helped us out and we’re going to turn it into a 40,000 square foot classroom, laboratory and office complex," she says.

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Local News
12:09 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Kentucky Judge Says Cabinet For Health And Family Services Must Explain Record Redaction

A judge has ordered Kentucky’s Cabinet for Health and Family Services to explain why it refuses to release certain information in child death and near death records, which has been a long-fought battle between the Cabinet and the media.

Since 2011 the Courier Journal and the Lexington Herald Leader have been in court with the Cabinet over two years worth of child abuse records.

“From the beginning they have felt the public was not entitled to anything. They continue to lose that fight," says attorney Jon Fleischaker who represents the media in the case.

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