Erin Keane

Arts and Humanities Reporter

Erin Keane covers Louisville's vibrant arts and humanities scene for WFPL. A former newspaper theater critic and arts writer, she has lived in Louisville since 1994 and is a graduate of the Kentucky Governor's School for the Arts, Bellarmine University's communications program and Spalding University's graduate creative writing program. 

Pages

Arts and Humanities
9:24 pm
Sun October 27, 2013

Former Louisville Orchestra Music Director Lawrence Leighton Smith Dies in Colorado

Lawrence Leighton Smith

Lawrence Leighton Smith, who served as music director of the Louisville Orchestra 1983-1994, died Friday at his home in Colorado Springs, Colo. He was 77 years old. Smith died of complications of Binswanger's disease, a severe form of vascular dementia. 

Read more
Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Fri October 25, 2013

Do You Hear the People Sing? For a Limited Time Only, 'Les Mis' on Louisville Community Stage

Lexie Stites, playing the role of Young Cosette in CenterStage's production of "Les Miserables."
Credit CenterStage

“Les Miserables” is one of the most popular musicals in the world. It's toured 42 countries in 22 languages. The original Broadway production won eight Tony Awards, and the latest film adaptation won three Oscars. The London show, which opened in 1985, is the longest-running West End musical. 

Read more
Arts and Humanities
4:36 pm
Thu October 24, 2013

Gershwin Expert Kevin Cole Plays with Louisville Orchestra on 'Rhapsody in Blue'

Kevin Cole, pianist, featured soloist with the Louisville Orchestra on George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue."

"Chapter One. He adored New York City. He idolized it all out of proportion. No, make that, he-he romanticized it all out of proportion. Yeah. To him, no matter what the season was, this was still a town that existed in black and white, and pulsated to the great tunes of George Gershwin." – Woody Allen, "Manhattan" (1979)

Read more
Arts and Humanities
2:38 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Up Close and Personal: Louisville Ballet Opens Studio for Intimate Program

Ashley Thursby dancing "La Vivandière" by Arthur Saint-Léon with Rob Morrow in Studio Connections.
Credit Wade Bell / Louisville Ballet

Ashley Thursby admits that dancing in the Louisville Ballet's Studio Connections program can be a little intimidating, especially on classical pieces like Victor Gsovsky's "Grande Pas Classique."  Compared to the Kentucky Center's Whitney Hall, where the company performs its mainstage productions, the audience in the company's rehearsal studio is so very close. 

Read more
Arts and Humanities
4:18 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Battlefield, Palace, Exile: Frazier History Museum Offers Intimate Look at Napoleon

Napoleon's watch.
Credit Frazier History Museum

Pierre-Jean Chalencon was 13 when his father gave him a book about French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte.

“And I thought the first time it was a cartoon,” he says. “My father says no, it’s not like Superman, Napoleon exists, I’m going to show you his house, his country house!”

Read more
Arts and Humanities
6:42 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Frazier History Museum's Popular Poe Program Peers Into the Tell-Tale Heart

Daguerreotype of Edgar Allan Poe 1848, first published 1880. Taken by W.S. Hartshorn, Providence, Rhode Island, November, 1848 From LoC "Famous People" collection [1], Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-10610
Credit Library of Congress

Beloved of weird kids and literary-minded adults alike, the popularity and influence of Edgar Allan Poe's poems and stories show no signs of flagging, even 164 years after his (quite mysterious) death. The Frazier History Museum knows—the museum has been bringing Poe's work to life during the Halloween season for four years now, adapting a total of 16 different stories and poems for the stage in intimate shows that tend to sell out early.

This year, alongside perennial favorites "The Raven" and "The Bells," the three-person cast will reprise their adaptation of the creepy monologue "The Tell-Tale Heart" as well as tackle some new material. The short stories "MS Found in a Bottle" and "The Fall of the House of Usher" will join "Annabel Lee" and "Dreamland" to round out the program.

Read more
Arts and Humanities
1:22 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

REVIEW | Whimsy Lightens the Dark in 'The Addams Family' Musical

Shaun Rice as Uncle Fester in the 2013-14 national tour of "The Addams Family."
Credit Carol Rosegg

They’re still creepy and kooky, but in “The Addams Family” musical, you can only snap along to that old theme song during the overture. With new songs and a story sourced not from the 1960s television show or the popular films but Charles Addams’ old New Yorker cartoons, the accomplished creative team behind the Broadway musical crafted a visually-rich, likable comedy by drawing on familiar Addams family character traits, gentle wit and a fun mix of musical styles.

Read more
Arts and Humanities
6:50 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Passion Project: A Timelapse Tour of Louisville

Credit Eric Stemen

  Do you ever feel like time is slipping away? Today's very cool thing: a time-lapse tour of Louisville. Eric Stemen started by photographing Louisville from the Indiana side of the Second Street Bridge one day last year, almost by accident

Read more
Arts and Humanities
2:00 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

Kentucky Shakespeare Plans Central Park Stage Restoration

Wadia Newman's new rendering of the C. Douglas Ramey Amphitheatre in Central Park.
Credit Wadia Newman / Kentucky Shakespeare

Kentucky Shakespeare artistic director Matt Wallace says in the past, the company would spend the first couple of weeks of their season in Central Park repairing the C. Douglas Ramey Amphitheatre to get the stage in shape for the summer productions. This year, he says he'd rather not put off needed repairs until after the winter, so the company has launched a Power2Give crowdfunding appeal to raise funds needed to restore the 20-year-old stage.

Read more
Arts and Humanities
10:52 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Louisville Artist Cuts Through Pain With Chainsaw

Andrew Marsh's “Meat me in the middle,” black walnut, elm and maple with iron.
Credit University of Louisville

Andrew Marsh was a full-time metal artist when he suffered a severe back injury about ten years ago while building St. Louis' City Museum. His days of welding giant steel structures were over, but you can't keep an artist from creating. Now the assistant director of the University of Louisville's Conn Center for Renewable Energy Research, Marsh works in recycled iron and reclaimed wood. And he's traded large-scale welding projects for a new tool of choice: the chainsaw.

Read more

Pages