Erin Keane

Arts and Humanities Reporter

Erin Keane covers Louisville's vibrant arts and humanities scene for WFPL. A former newspaper theater critic and arts writer, she has lived in Louisville since 1994 and is a graduate of the Kentucky Governor's School for the Arts, Bellarmine University's communications program and Spalding University's graduate creative writing program. 

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Arts and Humanities
2:45 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Kentucky Shakespeare Board Member on Twelfth Night: "Something We Didn't Feel We Could Overcome"

The abrupt cancellation of the remainder of Kentucky Shakespeare’s production of “Twelfth Night” in Central Park has raised questions about the company’s ability to deal with departing cast members. The company announced yesterday that after an unnamed cast member resigned, the production, directed by producing artistic director Brantley Dunaway, would not move forward.  

Dunaway has not returned requests for an interview.

Board chair Allen Harris says after Tuesday evening’s performance was canceled (“I imagine that was Brantley’s decision”), Dunaway and the board’s executive committee made a joint decision to cancel the remainder of the performances, which they announced yesterday. The show was scheduled to run through Sunday.

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Arts and Humanities
12:29 pm
Wed July 10, 2013

Kentucky Shakespeare Festival Cancels Remainder of 'Twelfth Night' Run

One of the mantras of the theater business is “the show must go on.” But after abruptly cancelling Tuesday evening’s Shakespeare in the Park performance of “Twelfth Night,” Kentucky Shakespeare announced today that the remainder of the run is off. Producing artistic director Brantley Dunaway also directed the production.

According to a release, an unnamed cast member resigned for personal reasons, and, due to budget restrictions, the production had no understudies to step in:

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Arts and Humanities
5:20 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Forecastle Festival Anticipates Bigger Crowds This Weekend

Forecastle Festival

Forecastle’s eleventh festival opens this weekend at Waterfront Park, and festival organizers are expecting to double last year's attendance. Over the years, the once-diminutive event founded by "Captain" J.K. McKnight in 2002 has grown from humble beginnings in Louisville’s Tyler Park to a three-day rock festival boasting headliners like Widespread Panic, Flaming Lips and yes, My Morning Jacket.

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Arts and Humanities
10:14 am
Fri July 5, 2013

Free Admission to More Than 20 Kentucky Museums for Military Families

Soldier and knight exhibit at the Frazier History Museum.
Frazier History Museum

Institutions participating in the Blue Star Museums program are opening their doors free of charge to active duty military personnel and their families through Labor Day. 

More than twenty Kentucky museums and programs are included in the initiative, including the Frazier History Museum, Locust Grove, the Muhammad Ali Center, the Oldham County History Center and “KentuckyShow!” at the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts.

Arts and Humanities
6:48 am
Fri July 5, 2013

48-Hour Film Project Celebrates Film on the Fly

Vancouver Film School Flickr

From first screenplay pitch to the world premiere, most films can take years to produce. In Louisville’s 48 Hour Film Project, which kicks off July 19, teams have just two days to write, film and edit a short movie.

Here’s how it works: all of the teams are assigned common elements that have to appear in every film – a line of dialogue, a character and a specific prop. Each team draws a different genre, so filmmakers who are horror buffs might end up assigned to make a romantic comedy. In two days.

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Arts and Humanities
1:00 pm
Thu July 4, 2013

New Albany's Public Art Project Celebrates Bicentennial

"New Albany Now," Tiffany Carbonneau, video
Tiffany Carbonneau

New Albany turns 200 years old this year. To celebrate, the Indiana town has unveiled the final pieces of its Public Art Project. The series culminates this summer with a series of outdoor installations exploring New Albany’s history. Nine pieces of public art are currently up in downtown New Albany, including four new works installed last month to complete the four-year bicentennial project.

This year’s four artists are interpreting themes dealing with New Albany’s art, culture and entertainment.

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Downtown Trolley Hop Adds South Fourth Street Route

Studio clay by Laura Ross opens at the new Craft(s) Gallery on South Fourth Street this Friday.
Craft(s) Gallery

The Louisville Downtown Management District extends its First Friday downtown Trolley Hop route this Friday. The new route connects the art galleries on South Fourth Street to the existing downtown art hop, which runs 5-11 p.m. on the first Friday of the month. 

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Arts and Humanities
6:41 am
Mon July 1, 2013

Red Feather Takes Flight: Kentucky Center Sculpture Will Be Removed for Restoration

"The Red Feather," 1975, Alexander Calder
Louisville Metro Images

The front steps of the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts will be missing a familiar figure this month. Alexander Calder’s eleven-feet-tall metal sculpture “The Red Feather” will be removed and packed for transit on July 13, where it will undergo a three-month restoration and repainting process in Virginia.

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Sat June 29, 2013

Unbound: Kirby Gann and Jacquelin Gorman on 'Windows Into Other Worlds'

On today’s episode, we’re catching glimpses into other worlds – into a hospital’s viewing room, where the dead are presented before they’re moved, and out a car window, where a prank unravels into an adventure. Hasn’t everyone dreamed of having super powers? In our first story, a boy with a secret identity reaches for something like power for the first time in Kirby Gann's “Anybody But Me.”   Then, we make the rounds with a hospital chaplain and look into the viewing room in Jacquelin Gorman's "Ghost Dance." 

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Unbound: Jacinda Townsend and Neela Vaswani on 'Object Permanence'

On today’s episode, we’re looking at the objects that define people and their place in time. In our first story, we go back to the 1960s, to Eastern Kentucky, to an odd little house in the country with no right angles. Jacinda Townsend reads “Rhombus,” a chapter from her forthcoming novel. Then, we climb into a white Chevy Nova and head to Astoria. It's 1979, and a grandmother has traveled from Bombay to New York to watch her grandchildren for the summer. Or are they keeping an eye on her? Neela Vaswani reads "Five Objects in Queens."

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