Erin Keane

Arts and Humanities Reporter

Erin Keane covers Louisville's vibrant arts and humanities scene for WFPL. A former newspaper theater critic and arts writer, she has lived in Louisville since 1994 and is a graduate of the Kentucky Governor's School for the Arts, Bellarmine University's communications program and Spalding University's graduate creative writing program. 

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Arts and Humanities
10:00 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Ghislain d’Humières Named New CEO of the Speed Art Museum

Ghislain d'Humieres
Credit Brandon Snider/TEDxOU

Ghislain d’Humières will be the new chief executive of the Speed Art Museum, the museum announced Tuesday morning during a news conference at its temporary East Market Street offices.

He is replacing Charles Venable, who left the Speed to helm the Indianapolis Museum of Art last October.

D’Humières is leaving the University of Oklahoma’s Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, where he has served as director and chief curator since 2007. He also served on faculty at the university as the Wylodean and Bill Saxon Chair and as an associate professor.

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Arts and Humanities
9:27 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Green Building Gallery Hosts Louisville Women in Arts Panel

Theatre artists and writers have established public platforms in recent years to fight gender disparities in their industries and advocate for women in the arts — notably the League of Professional Theater Women's 50/50 in 2020 initiative and the Lilly Awards, and VIDA, the literary organization that put hard numbers behind the general feeling that male writers outnumbered women in the country's highest publishing a

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Tue June 25, 2013

Unbound: Tessa Mellas and Claire Vaye Watkins on 'Girlfriends'

Today’s episode looks at friendships between two pairs of girls, complex in nature and sometimes fraught with danger. Like roommates. Can’t live with them, can’t exile them to space. College is a time to make lasting friendships, but what if your freshman roommate turns out to be from another planet? Our first story is Tessa Mellas with “Bibi From Jupiter.” Then "our girl" takes her best friend to Sin City to get over her boyfriend. Claire Vaye Watkins explores the things that happen in Vegas, but don't quite stay there, in “Rondine Al Nido.”

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Arts and Humanities
1:05 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

REVIEW | The Price of Beauty Examined in 'Reasons to Be Pretty'

Cara McHugh as Steph and Doug Schutte as Greg in Neil LaBute's "Reasons to Be Pretty" at The Bard's Town Theatre.
The Bard's Town Theatre

Neil LaBute’s plays aren’t for the faint of heart. His relationship drama “reasons to be pretty” opens with a ferocious profanity-laden fight between a woman and her boyfriend who allegedly alleged to a friend that she wasn’t necessarily the prettiest girl in the room. There’s no warm-up, just a donnybrook of personal attacks and incriminations. It’s uncomfortable in that way that witnessing an intimate fight can be – do I laugh? Do I cringe? Is he lying? Is she overreacting? Yes.

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Arts and Humanities
6:32 am
Mon June 24, 2013

REVIEW | 'Dead Man's Cell Phone' a Game-Changer for Theatre [502]

Dara Tiller as Hermia in Sarah Ruhl's "Dead Man's Cell Phone."
Theatre [502]

Theatre [502] has produced consistently intriguing productions of recent and relevant plays since its inaugural season in 2011. Their list of produced playwrights is growing into a Who’s Who of younger award-winning dramatists: Annie Baker, Peter Sinn Nachtrieb, Jordan Harrison, Rajiv Joseph, Marco Ramirez, Mat Smart. Top-notch acting and directing and thoughtful design have been their hallmarks.

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Sat June 22, 2013

Unbound: Tania James and Kyle Minor on 'Alternate Histories'

Today’s episode considers the alternate history. What if things had been different in our lives? What if the people we think we know, know nothing about who we are, or were? And what happens when they try to find out?

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Arts and Humanities
12:01 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

REVIEW | Love Fools: Kentucky Shakespeare Opens Winsome 'Twelfth Night'

Peter Riopelle as Feste and Jonathan Visser as Malvolio (caged) in Kentucky Shakespeare Festival's "Twelfth Night."
Melissa Donald Productions Kentucky Shakespeare Festival

The Kentucky Shakespeare Festival opened its 54th season last night with a winsome Celtic-styled “Twelfth Night, or What You Will.” Directed by producing artistic director Brantley Dunaway, this gender-switching, mistaken identity romantic comedy is sweet enough to serve as a date-night destination but sufficiently silly for a night out with friends, too.

A storm wrecks a ship off the coast of Illyria, separating spirited Viola (Madison Dunaway) from her twin brother, Sebastian (Kyle Curry), whom she assumes dead. These are dangerous times for a lady unaccompanied, so she dons men’s clothing and transforms into “Cesario” to enter into service with the local duke, Orsino (the quite funny John Pasha), a preening, love-sick goof mooning over his neighbor, Olivia (Rosie Ward).

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Unbound: Roxane Gay and Alex Taylor on 'Crime and Punishment'

In each episode of Unbound, we hear stories from two different authors on a theme. Today's episode is about crime and punishment. In our first story, a woman survives an unthinkable crime, but she doesn't get a happily-ever-after ending in Roxane Gay's "Things I Know About Fairy Tales." Then, we'll travel to the wilds of Western Kentucky to learn how you can punish a man for his crimes after he's dead. Two men in search of a body pack a camera, a violin, and a case of beer and head out on the open water in Alex Taylor's “The Name of the Nearest River.” 

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Arts and Humanities
12:23 pm
Thu June 20, 2013

From the Ring to the Stage: Women Wrestlers Fight It Out for 'Booty of the Year'

Louisville playwright Larry Muhammad grew up watching professional wrestling in the 1960s. He loves the sport because it’s over the top and larger than life – in other words, perfect for the stage.

"I grew up watching people like Gorgeous George, who was one of the first national entertainment figures. He wasn’t that great of a wrestler but he was a fantastic showman," says Muhammad, a retired Courier-Journal reporter who writes plays under the name Cisco Montgomery.

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Thu June 20, 2013

Unbound: Patrick Wensink and Gwenda Bond on 'Bad Luck'

In each episode of Unbound, we hear stories from two different authors on a theme. Today’s episode is about luck. We’d like to think we’re entirely in control of our destinies, but fortune doesn’t smile equally on everyone. 

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