Erin Keane

Arts and Humanities Reporter

Erin Keane covers Louisville's vibrant arts and humanities scene for WFPL. A former newspaper theater critic and arts writer, she has lived in Louisville since 1994 and is a graduate of the Kentucky Governor's School for the Arts, Bellarmine University's communications program and Spalding University's graduate creative writing program. 

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Arts and Humanities
12:52 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

ArtPlace Grant Awarded to Harlan County Theater Project

The Appalachian Program at Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College in Cumberland has produced original plays about prescription drug abuse, life in the coal mines and how young people decide to stay or leave Harlan County after graduation. The program compiles oral histories and interviews with Harlan County residents and turns them into plays about the present and future of Eastern Kentucky.

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Arts and Humanities
5:02 pm
Thu June 21, 2012

Actors Theatre Adds Eno Play to Upcoming Season

Louis Cancelmi and Tom Ryan in the staged reading of Will Eno's "Gnit," during Portland Center Stage's 2010 JAW: a Playwright's Festival.
Patrick Weishampel Portland Center Stage

Actors Theatre of Louisville will stage the world premiere of Will Eno’s “Gnit” in the 37th Humana Festival of New American Plays next year. "Gnit" also rounds out the mainstage Brown-Forman Series for the 2012-13 season. 

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Arts and Humanities
12:56 pm
Wed June 20, 2012

South End Leaders Plan New Trolley Hop

Proposed New Cut Corridor trolley hop route.

The Courier-Journal reports that community leaders in Louisville's New Cut Corridor are seeking funds for a monthly trolley hop planned around cultural and community programs.

The C-J says community activist Ray Whitener has been instrumental in gathering support from community leaders, including state Senator Perry Clark:

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Arts and Humanities
4:55 pm
Tue June 19, 2012

Tech Pioneer Tackles Jane Austen Sequel

Pal Hansen

When Silicon Valley entrepreneur Sandy Lerner was a computational mathematics graduate student at Stanford University in the early Eighties, she would blow off steam by retreating into romantic world of Jane Austen’s novels. She fell in love with the BBC’s 1980 miniseries of “Pride and Prejudice,” and immediately started working her way through Austen’s books.

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Arts and Humanities
1:34 pm
Mon June 18, 2012

REVIEW: The Bunbury's 'Buried Child' Delivers

A dark secret haunts a rural Illinois farmhouse where a once-proud family molders in disgrace in Sam Shepard’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play “Buried Child.” The play is sometimes described as a dark comedy, and its humor does serve to occasionally diffuse the almost stifling tension that pervades the play. But ultimately, “Buried Child” is a disorienting tragedy about the dissolution of the American family and the legacy of shame that causes one household to unravel and curl violently inward.

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Arts and Humanities
6:00 am
Mon June 18, 2012

Review: 'Misses Strata': Crude Humor Satisfies in New Bipartisan Satire

The more things change, the more things stay the same. 2,500 years after Aristophanes first suggested women could end a war by kicking powerful husbands out of their beds in “Lysistrata,” the idea is still compelling to playwrights and politicians alike (a Michigan state representative recently suggested a similar strategy).

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Arts and Humanities
10:42 am
Thu June 14, 2012

NEA Study Associates the Arts with Higher Student Achievement

The National Endowment for the Arts has released a new report that draws a strong association between arts involvement and academic achievement for at-risk youth. 

In his introduction to the report, NEA chair Rocco Landesman writes:

Students who have arts-rich experiences in school do better across-the-board academically, and they also become more active and engaged citizens, voting, volunteering, and generally participating at higher rates than their peers. 

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Arts and Humanities
3:39 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Pandora Ends Season with 'My Big Gay Italian Wedding'

It’s no wonder the wedding has been a staple of stage comedy since Shakespeare’s time. A wedding has all the elements of a stage production: a supporting cast and two romantic leads, an audience, costumes and even a script. The effort of producing a real spectacle can bring even the most experienced stage manager–or wedding planner–to his knees. 

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Arts and Humanities
4:35 pm
Tue June 12, 2012

Crime Novelist Charlie Newton Marries Truth and Fiction

Charlie Newton, author of "Start Shooting," will read and lead a workshop at Second Story Books this week.
Lisa Law

Novelist Charlie Newton weaves complex plots of crime and corruption out of unrelated true stories. The rape and murder of a young girl and a strange history of biological warfare in Japan collide in “Start Shooting,” the Chicago native’s acclaimed second novel.

While a gang war threatens the city’s bid for the Olympics, a guitar-playing cop and a desperate actress from the same gritty Chicago neighborhood are forced to confront corruption, violence and the legacy of a family murder.

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Arts and Humanities
9:48 am
Mon June 11, 2012

Kentucky Natives Win Tony Awards

Ashland native Steve Kazee picked up a Tony Award last night for Leading Actor in a Musical for his performance as Guy in "Once," the Broadway adaptation of the 2006 film an Irish busker and a Czech immigrant who spend a week together writing and playing music. "Once" won eight Tony awards this year, including Best Musical.

Kazee graduated from Morehead State University and has appeared in many television and stage productions, including a run as Sir Lancelot in "Spamalot."

Watch Kazee's emotional acceptance, which he dedicated to his "Once" co-star and his late mother. 

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