Korva Coleman

Korva Coleman is a newscaster for NPR.

In this role, she is responsible for writing, producing, and delivering national newscasts airing during NPR's newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition. Occasionally she serves as a substitute host for Talk of the Nation, Weekend All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Before joining NPR in 1990, Coleman was a staff reporter and copy editor for the Washington Afro-American newspaper. She produced and hosted First Edition, an overnight news program at NPR's member station WAMU-FM in Washington, D.C.

Early in her career, Coleman worked in commercial radio as news and public affairs directors at stations in Phoenix and Tucson.

Coleman's work has been recognized by the Arizona Associated Press Awards for best radio newscast, editorial, and short feature. In 1983, she was nominated for Outstanding Young Woman of America.

Coleman earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Howard University. She studied law at Georgetown University Law Center.

The Two-Way
10:49 am
Thu May 2, 2013

Send Your Haiku To Mars! NASA Seeks Poets

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope took this close-up of the red planet Mars in 2007, when it was just 55 million miles away.
NASA UPI/Landov

Originally published on Thu May 2, 2013 1:33 pm

Galactic poet?

Here's how to become famous.

Send your work to Mars!

NASA is raising awareness for its upcoming launch of the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution spacecraft with its Going to Mars project. The MAVEN spacecraft is scheduled for launch this November, to study the Red Planet's upper atmosphere; the craft will examine why Mars lost its atmosphere, and how that catastrophe affected the history of water there.

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The Two-Way
12:51 pm
Wed April 24, 2013

Midwest Rivers Crest As Flooding Turns Deadly

National Weather Service Significant Flood Outlook for the week of April 23 - 28, 2013.
National Weather Service

Originally published on Wed April 24, 2013 2:02 pm

Flooding continues to plague the upper Midwest, as waters crested at record highs in places and weary river-town residents watched the flood markers for signs of relief.

NPR's David Schaper, reporting from Chicago, tells our Newscast Unit that the Mississippi River continues to rise, overtopping small levees north of St. Louis. But he says some of the bigger problems are in Illinois, near the town of Peoria, where "many roads, homes and businesses are flooded, and dozens of Peoria-area residents have been evacuated."

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The Two-Way
1:28 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

Boy Scouts Propose Ending Ban On Gay Youth

A statue outside the National Scouting Museum in Irving, Texas.
Tom Pennington Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 19, 2013 12:51 pm

The Boy Scouts of America says it will propose lifting its ban of gay members of the organization. The matter will be put to a vote of its 1,400 members of the Boy Scout National Council next month.

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The Two-Way
10:41 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Which Is The Most Miserable U.S. City? Detroit.

A pedestrian walks in downtown Detroit on Oct. 24, 2012.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 10:15 am

Forbes magazine is out with its latest ranking of "Most Miserable Cities" in the U.S. and of 20 metropolitan areas listed, Detroit is on top.

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The Two-Way
10:55 am
Tue January 29, 2013

Beijing's Smog Is So Bad They're Cancelling Flights

Downtown Beijing in the clouds of its latest air pollution emergency.
Lintao Zhang Getty

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 11:00 am

The pollution in China's capital has intensified again, and some residents are turning to gas masks to breathe. The U.S. Embassy in Beijing is tracking the current air quality, and it's most recent reading finds that even late at night, the air is hazardous: "Everyone should avoid all physical activity outdoors; people with heart or lung disease, older adults and children should remain indoors and keep activity levels low."

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The Two-Way
3:50 pm
Wed October 24, 2012

Equal Pay For Equal Work: Not Even College Helps Women

Barnard College graduates listen to President Barack Obama at commencement ceremonies on May 14, 2012.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Wed October 24, 2012 11:10 am

A startling new report finds freshly graduated college women will likely face this hurdle when entering the work world: they're worth less than equally educated men.

The American Association of University Women is releasing a new study that shows when men and women attend the same kind of college, pick the same major and accept the same kind of job, on average, the woman will still earn 82 cents to every dollar that a man earns.

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The Two-Way
9:41 pm
Sat August 25, 2012

Storm Forces Republicans To Cancel Monday Convention Events

Tropical Storm Isaac's projected path on Saturday, Aug. 25, 2012
National Hurricane Center

Originally published on Sat August 25, 2012 8:55 pm

Tropical Storm Isaac has been difficult to track, but its potential to affect Florida has caused the Republican National Convention to change its plans. Events for Monday have been canceled, though the committee will convene briefly. As Alan Greenblatt reported for It's All Politics, this is now the second-consecutive Republican National Convention to be delayed by a storm.

Update at 8:55 p.m. ET. Nomination Delayed:

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The Two-Way
3:55 pm
Sat August 25, 2012

Neil Armstrong, First Man To Walk On The Moon, Dies

Armstrong in the lunar module after the historic moonwalk.
AP NASA

Originally published on Sun August 26, 2012 5:28 pm

Former astronaut Neil Armstrong, known for his words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind," has died. The first man ever to walk on the moon was 82.

Update at 5:15 p.m. ET:

Armstrong's family has released a statement, saying he died following cardiovascular procedures. NASA published it here. They say, "Armstrong was also a reluctant American hero who always believed he was just doing his job."

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