Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Pages

The Two-Way
9:29 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Feds Charge NSA Leaker With Spying, Theft

A woman in Hong Kong walks past a banner displayed in support of Edward Snowden this week.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 8:10 am

  • Carrie Johnson speaks with Robert Siegel about the charges on "All Things Considered"

The Washington Post reports that federal prosecutors have charged Edward Snowden — the former NSA contractor who leaked classified information on secret U.S. electronic surveillance operations — with espionage, theft and conversion of government property.

Read more
The Two-Way
1:44 pm
Fri June 21, 2013

Supermoon To Dominate Weekend Sky

A "supermoon" rises in Washington, D.C., on March 19, 2011.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:49 pm

The largest full moon of the year will grace the night sky Sunday as our nearest neighbor in space makes its closest approach.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:50 pm
Sun June 16, 2013

NSA Leaks Caused Terrorists To Change Tactics, Senator Says

Sens. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., and Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., speak to the media about the controversial National Security Agency programs.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 1:22 pm

Republican Sen. Saxby Chambliss tells NBC's Meet The Press on Sunday that information leaked to the media by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden has caused terrorists to change their tactics to thwart detection.

Asked if Snowden, believed to be in hiding in Hong Kong, qualified as a "traitor" who should face U.S. justice, Chambliss, R-Ga., replied, "If he's not a traitor, then he's pretty darn close to it.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:10 pm
Fri June 14, 2013

U.S. Navy Approves Use Of Lowercase Letters

Teletype operators relay U.S. military communications in North Africa during World War II.
AP

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 6:33 pm

A recent directive issued by the U.S. Navy was transmitted in the customary format, using all uppercase letters. Sailors, it said, are:

"AUTHORIZED TO USE STANDARD, MIXED-CASE CHARACTERS IN THE BODY OF NAVY ORGANIZATIONAL MESSAGES."

Read more
The Two-Way
6:25 am
Fri June 14, 2013

U.S. Says It Has 'High Confidence' Syria Used Chemical Weapons

Syrian rebel fighters hold a position Thursday in the northwestern town of Maaret al-Numan. At least 93,000 people, including more than 6,500 children, have been killed in Syria's civil war.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 8:19 pm

The White House has "high confidence" that the Syrian regime is using chemical weapons against rebel forces, and the U.S. is prepared to offer military assistance to the opposition, a senior administration official said Thursday.

Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes said that an estimated 100 to 150 Syrians have been killed in attacks using sarin gas, although the figure "is likely incomplete."

Read more
The Two-Way
6:49 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Newspaper Reveals Source For NSA Surveillance Stories

In a 12-minute video on The Guardian's website, Edward Snowden, a former technical assistant for the CIA talks about how American surveillance systems work and why he decided to reveal that information to the public.
The Guardian

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 6:32 am

  • "Guardian" reporter Glenn Greenwald on weekends on "All Things Considered"

The Guardian newspaper has identified the source for a series of reports it's published in recent days on secret U.S. surveillance activity as a former technical assistant for the CIA who now works for a private-sector defense and technology consulting firm.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:08 am
Fri May 31, 2013

TSA: No More Graphic, Full-Body Airport Scans

A U.S. Transportation Security Administration employee demonstrates the less intrusive Automated Target Recognition software in 2011.
Ethan Miller Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 7:40 pm

The Transportation Security Administration has told Congress that it's finished retrofitting airport scanners to blunt a widely criticized technology that shows graphic detail of a passenger's body as he or she goes through security checkpoints.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:32 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Boy Scouts Vote To Admit Openly Gay Members

Members of Scouts for Equality hold a rally to support inclusion for gays in the Boy Scouts of America on Wednesday.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 7:35 pm

The Boy Scouts of America has agreed for the first time to allow openly gay boys as members, but a vote of the organization's National Council left in place a ban on gay Scout leaders.

The Associated Press reports that of the local Scout leaders voting at their annual meeting in Texas, more than 60 percent supported the proposal. The policy change approved by the 1,400-member National Council would take effect Jan. 1, 2014, the organization said.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:44 pm
Thu May 23, 2013

Obama To Limit Drone Strikes, Renew Effort To Close Guantanamo

President Obama speaks about his administration's drone and counterterrorism policies at the National Defense University on Thursday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 7:03 pm

President Obama on Thursday unveiled a major pivot in White House counterterrorism policy, calling for a limiting of CIA drones strikes and for a renewed effort to close the U.S. detention center at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:23 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Judge: Unredeemed Borders Gift Cards Are Worthless

Customers walk out of Borders on July 22, 2011, in San Francisco, Calif., as the chain began liquidating.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 8:34 am

If you were hoping to cash in that Borders gift card for the latest Dan Brown novel — or at least hoping to get some cash for it — you're too late.

A Manhattan federal judge on Wednesday ruled that the bankrupt and defunct book chain owes nothing to the roughly 17.7 million people who hold $210.5 million in unredeemed gift cards.

U.S. District Judge Andrew Carter says it would be unfair to Borders Group's other creditors to let gift-card holders pursue recoveries, Reuters reports:

Read more

Pages