Local News
4:26 pm
Fri December 6, 2013

Byline | Six-Time Felon Kills; Electronic Toll Collection Issues; Chris Matthews

Here are the stories we discussed today on Byline (full audio below):

At the top - The murder of Indiana teenager Tara Rose Willenborg. R.G. Dunlop from the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting tells us how her accused killer was out of jail despite a history of violent crime and six felony convictions.

9:20 - As many churches struggle to stay afloat, the Evangelical movement continues to expand across America.  It’s a movement that has fascinated Tanya Luhrmann, a psychological anthropologist from Stanford University, and winner of the 2014 Grawemeyer Award for Religion. Specifically, she wanted to learn more about Evangelical prayer, where God becomes active and present in one's life. Luhrmann spent four years studying the Vineyard Christian Fellowship church in California and Chicago. The result was a book entitled When God Talks Back: Understanding the American Evangelical Relationship with God. WFPL’s Jonathan Bastian speaks with Luhrmann about her book and her research.

14:00 - Electronic tolling will be used to collect money from motorists to help pay for the Ohio River Bridges Project. But how cost-effective is the system? John Boel from WAVE television has been looking at electronic tolling systems in place elsewhere and tells us what he found.

19:00 - Area colleges and universities are cranking out more degrees than ever before and Louisville now has a record number of residents who have earned an associate’ degree or higher. Those are positive trends. But Louisville struggles to keep many of those homegrown degree earners around, and the city has issues attracting new talent. As cities compete for people, growth and innovation, WFPL’s Devin Katayama explores how Louisville is trying to make the case that it’s a place to stay.

23:45 - MSNBC’s Chris Matthews is an political commentator known to grill guests and ruffle talking points. As the host of Hardball, Matthews has had infamous takedowns of Democratic and Republican politicians and their surrogates. But much of his new book is about how two titans of liberal and conservative values were able to find some common ground. WFPL’s Phillip Bailey talked to Matthews about “Tip and the Gipper” and the shared Irish heritage of President Ronald Reagan and Speaker Tip O’Neill.

30:10 - Minik Wallace is an Inuit boy who, at the age of 7, was taken to Manhattan to be studied by the Museum of Natural History. It's quite different than what we'd expect from museums today. In this edition of The Memory Palace, Nate DiMeo tells us the unique story.

36:30 - In our arts segment, WFPL arts and humanities reporter Erin Keane talks with Davy Rothbart, one of the directors of Medora, a new documentary that follows a small Indiana town's high school basketball team for a year.

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