Education
6:56 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Civil Rights Letters to be on Digital Display at the University of Louisville

Martin Luther King Jr.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

The Civil Rights movement of the 1960s had many voices of support.

In Louisville, one of those voices was Anne Braden. Braden wrote many letters to Martin Luther King Jr. Some expressed support—others asked for support.

Those letters, along with other original documents associated with the Civil Rights movement, will be on digital display at the Ekstrom Library on the University of Louisville campus from Oct. 21 through Oct. 25.

The exhibit is part of a traveling showcase featuring a digital archive of King’s correspondence, sermons, speeches and other key documents that have been preserved by the King Center in Atlanta.

Visitors can participate in the exhibit through an interactive Dream Wall, UofL spokeswoman Janene Zaccone said.

Visitors will be able to write their personal dreams on a card, post them on a wall and then those dream cards will be digitized and archived by the King Center, she said. Zaccone said the exhibit will enable UofL to extend an ongoing effort to educate the public on the Civil Rights movement.

Those include the Anne Braden Institute for Social Justice Research, which was established after her death in 2006 with the mission to advance public understanding of the Civil Rights movement.

And Project Progress is another way educators are focusing on the effects of the Civil Rights movement. Project Progress focuses on the movement from 1963 to 1968 and dissects each year’s progress towards equality. The program lasts until 2018.

“We will be comparing what happened then and where we are now,” she said.

The exhibit’s only appearance in Kentucky will be at the UofL campus. Hours of the exhibit will be from 1 p.m.to 8 p.m. on Oct. 21, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Oct. 22-Oct. 24 and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Oct. 25. For more information on the King Center or the digital archive, visit thekingcenter.org.