Local News
9:01 am
Sun May 12, 2013

What We're Reading | 5.12.13

Credit Fox

Each week, members of the WFPL News team spotlight interesting stories we've read and enjoyed, for your weekend reading pleasure:

Gabe Bullard: This year, as reporters from around the city and country prepared to cover the Kentucky Derby, there was one question they were all asking, "What's the new media center like?" The old media center has been replaced by The Mansion, an ultra-luxury premium seating space above the finish line. In retrospect, the fact that this excellent vantage was given for free to the press seems too good to be true. WDRB's Eric Crawford has written about the change.

He has a disclaimer at the top of his essay saying it may only be of interest to journalists. That's the only misplaced sentiment in the piece, as Crawford goes on to draw connections between the movement of the press box and changes in the attraction of horse racing and the business of racetracks. Read A Kentucky Derby Postscript.

Erin Keane:  I'm reading this energetic and insightful interview poet (and University of Louisville graduate) Julie Marie Wade conducted with Denise Duhamel for The Rumpus. Wade fell in love with Duhamel's smart, funny, accessible work (she's the author of, among others, "Kinky," a book of feminist-lens poems about Barbie) as a graduate student, and now they're colleagues at Florida International University. Duhamel reveals which of her poems comes close to saying everything she ever needs to say, admits she doesn't regret any of the poems she's published and gives young poets some good advice about slowing down. Read The Rumpus Interview with Denise Duhamel.

Joseph Lord: Lots of people write on the Internet about "Girls," Lena Dunham's ode to youthful misadventure in New York City on HBO. But not that many people actually watch the show. Significantly more people watch Fox's "New Girl," which touches on a few of the same concepts. The attention goes to to the star, Zooey Deschanel, but the New Republic profiles "New Girl" creator and showrunner Liz Meriwether and finds that her goals are similar to Dunham's, though the approach is quite different. Read Liz Meriwether is the Anti-Lena Dunham.