Local News
8:41 am
Sun June 30, 2013

What We're Reading | 6.30.13

Each week, members of the WFPL News team spotlight interesting stories we've read and enjoyed, for your weekend reading pleasure:

Gabe Bullard: Steve Kandell is the longform editor of Buzzfeed. This week, he was on the Longform.org podcast (he makes the joke that longform on Buzzfeed is 1,000 cat gifs). In the interview, he brings up a recent story written by Jessica Testa. Testa is a Buzzfeed staffer who posted the video of a man killing himself on live television after a car chase. Fox News aired it originally, but Testa was among those who helped the clip go viral. For her longform piece, she returns to the story, and finds out why the man, Jodon Romero, wound up in a car chase and televised suicide. Read Why Did Jodon Romero Kill Himself On Live Television?

James Gandolfini
Credit Creative Commons

Laura Ellis: Last week I was too sad to read anything, due to the untimely death of James Gandolfini. I was a huge fan of the Sopranos. It's the first show I ever watched every episode of, start-to-finish. It was a few years after it had gone off the air, so I was a little behind the water cooler talk. Then about a year ago, I watched it all again. Watching the relationship Gandolfini and Edie Falco created between Tony and Carmela could be a master class in acting. Read How Tony Soprano Changed Television.

Bonus: But wait, there's more! I went for a hike on Memorial Day over in Jeffersonville's Lapping Park. It was lovely, but I brought home five unwelcome guests in the form of ticks (three on me and two on my dog Wilson). So I've been keeping an eye out for signs of Lyme Disease. But until I read this article, I had no idea how controversial its diagnosis and treatment is. And gross, of course. Read The Lyme Wars.

Joseph Lord: In my job, I spend more than a little time of thinking how to get news to people on the Internet. So I was particularly interested in Washington Post writer Ezra Klein's argument against relying entirely on Twitter to get your news. It's short (taken from the Aspen Ideas Festival) but sweet. Read Ezra Klein's Case Against Getting Your News from Twitter.