actors theatre of louisville

Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Thu April 18, 2013

The Big Break: The Grand Finale

The first season of our audio diary series “The Big Break,” comes to a close this week. Since last fall, understudies and apprentices take us behind the curtain at the Kentucky Opera, Actors Theatre of Louisville and the Louisville Ballet. 

We'll launch the next season of The Big Break with a new class of up-and-coming artists in the early fall. 

For their final diaries, actor Samantha Beach and dancer Claire Horrocks reflect on their time in Louisville and shaer what lies ahead now that the season is over. 

Arts and Humanities
6:49 am
Fri April 5, 2013

'Sleep Rock Thy Brain' Play Uses Science As Inspiration

Originally published on Thu April 4, 2013 8:20 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well, now a more subjective study of dreams. It comes from the Humana Festival of New American Plays in Louisville, Kentucky. The festival was founded by Actors Theatre of Louisville. And each year, that theater commissions a new work for its company of apprentice actors. This year's show, a series of three one-act plays, is called "Sleep Rock Thy Brain."

Erin Keane of member station WFPL got a front row seat.

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Thu April 4, 2013

The Big Break: The Next Steps

On our audio diary series “The Big Break,” understudies and apprentices take us behind the curtain at the Kentucky Opera, Actors Theatre of Louisville and the Louisville Ballet. The season is almost over for the actors and dancers. Her time in Louisville is almost up, so Actors Theater apprentice Samantha Beach has to decide where she wants to build the next phase of her career. Louisville Ballet trainee Claire Horrocks makes plans for her summer that will help her prepare for a possibility every dancer fears -- the day she can't dance anymore.

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Thu March 28, 2013

The Big Break: High Notes and Early Calls

This week on The Big Break, Actors Theatre of Louisville apprentice Samantha Beach reflects on tech week for "Sleep Rock Thy Brain," the apprentice play that opened last weekend in the Humana Festival of New American Plays. (The music in this week's episode is from "Sleep Rock Thy Brain," composed and performed by Scott Anthony, the show's composer and sound designer.)

Over at the Louisville Ballet, trainee Claire Horrocks, who also teaches at the ballet school, describes the joyful madness that is a spring showcase, a true community effort at the Louisville Ballet School. 

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Arts and Humanities
3:53 pm
Mon March 25, 2013

REVIEW | Immerse Yourself in 'O Guru Guru Guru'

Rebecca Hart in "O Guru Guru Guru, or why I don't want to go to yoga class with you."
Alan Simons Actors Theatre of Louisville

Playwright Mallery Avidon had an unconventional upbringing. As a kid and young teen she lived, on and off, in an ashram -- the same ashram that later cropped up as a setting in Elizabeth Gilbert's nonfiction book "Eat Pray Love," later made into a movie starring Julia Roberts. Avidon mines those experiences in her engaging autobiographical play, "O Guru Guru Guru or why I don't want to go to yoga class with you," an attempt to reconcile several complicated, competing emotions about contentment, identity and spirituality.

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Arts and Humanities
6:31 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

An Audience of One: Playwright Mallery Avidon on Writing for Herself

Rebecca Hart in "O Guru Guru Guru, or why I don't want to go to yoga class with you."
Alan Simons Actors Theatre of Louisville

Playwright Mallery Avidon mines her unconventional childhood for her new play, “O Guru Guru Guru, or why I don't want to go to yoga class with you.”

"Part of that unconventional upbringing has to do with the ashram that Elizabeth Gilbert goes to in the book 'Eat Pray Love,' that Julia Roberts goes to in the movie 'Eat Pray Love.' The play is an investigation of the way that unconventional spirituality affected my life," says Avidon.

Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Thu March 21, 2013

The Big Break: On Your Toes

This week on The Big Break, the Louisville Ballet rehearses for its upcoming mixed repertory program, Breaking Ground while trainee Claire Horrocks gets called up to the stage for a surprise bonus role. Over at Actors Theatre of Louisville, acting apprentice Samantha Beach finishes up rehearsals for "Sleep Rock Thy Brain," the apprentice anthology play that opens this weekend, and she reflects on the new play rehearsal process. 

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Arts and Humanities
8:08 am
Wed March 20, 2013

REVIEW | Family Secrets Fester in 'Appropriate'

Larry Bull as Bo and Jordan Baker as Toni in "Appropriate."
Alan Simons Actors Theatre of Louisville

As the curtain rises on Branden Jacobs-Jenkins' "Appropriate," a rattling chorus of 13-year cicadas fills the Pamela Brown Auditorium. Far from a gentle nocturne, the sound swells with the pregnant heat of a southern summer night, conjuring images of rattling bones. Low lights reveal a man and a younger woman slipping through an open window into the living room of a plantation house that had, to be kind, seen better days.

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Arts and Humanities
1:37 pm
Tue March 19, 2013

REVIEW | Smart, Funny, Tough to Love: Will Eno's 'Gnit'

Dan Waller as Peter and Kate Eastwood Norris in one of her many roles in Will Eno's "Gnit."
Kathy R. Preher Actors Theatre of Louisville

Billed as a willfully unfaithful adaptation of Henrik Ibsen’s classic picaresque tale “Peer Gynt,” Will Eno’s “Gnit” up-ends the classic man’s-search-for-meaning quest with an ambitiously absurdist self-discovery journey that stubbornly chafes against the conventions of the genre.

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Arts and Humanities
5:29 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

The Terrible Fate of Being Understood: an Interview with Playwright Will Eno

Dan Waller and Hannah Bos in "Gnit" at Actors Theatre of Louisville.
Kathy R. Preher Actors Theatre of Louisville

The New York Times calls playwright Will Eno “a Samuel Beckett for the Jon Stewart generation.” In this year’s Humana Festival of New American Plays at Actors Theatre of Louisville, he’s turned his keen sense of irony and compassion to a loose adaptation of Henrik Ibsen’s Norweigian classic picaresque “Peer Gynt.” 

"Gnit," Eno's re-imagining of Ibsen's play, is the story of a man’s journey to find his true self, which happens to be disintegrating as he searches. 

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