Arts

Arts and Humanities
2:38 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Up Close and Personal: Louisville Ballet Opens Studio for Intimate Program

Ashley Thursby dancing "La Vivandière" by Arthur Saint-Léon with Rob Morrow in Studio Connections.
Credit Wade Bell / Louisville Ballet

Ashley Thursby admits that dancing in the Louisville Ballet's Studio Connections program can be a little intimidating, especially on classical pieces like Victor Gsovsky's "Grande Pas Classique."  Compared to the Kentucky Center's Whitney Hall, where the company performs its mainstage productions, the audience in the company's rehearsal studio is so very close. 

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Arts and Humanities
4:18 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

Battlefield, Palace, Exile: Frazier History Museum Offers Intimate Look at Napoleon

Napoleon's watch.
Credit Frazier History Museum

Pierre-Jean Chalencon was 13 when his father gave him a book about French emperor Napoleon Bonaparte.

“And I thought the first time it was a cartoon,” he says. “My father says no, it’s not like Superman, Napoleon exists, I’m going to show you his house, his country house!”

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Arts and Humanities
6:42 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Frazier History Museum's Popular Poe Program Peers Into the Tell-Tale Heart

Daguerreotype of Edgar Allan Poe 1848, first published 1880. Taken by W.S. Hartshorn, Providence, Rhode Island, November, 1848 From LoC "Famous People" collection [1], Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-10610
Credit Library of Congress

Beloved of weird kids and literary-minded adults alike, the popularity and influence of Edgar Allan Poe's poems and stories show no signs of flagging, even 164 years after his (quite mysterious) death. The Frazier History Museum knows—the museum has been bringing Poe's work to life during the Halloween season for four years now, adapting a total of 16 different stories and poems for the stage in intimate shows that tend to sell out early.

This year, alongside perennial favorites "The Raven" and "The Bells," the three-person cast will reprise their adaptation of the creepy monologue "The Tell-Tale Heart" as well as tackle some new material. The short stories "MS Found in a Bottle" and "The Fall of the House of Usher" will join "Annabel Lee" and "Dreamland" to round out the program.

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Arts and Humanities
1:22 pm
Thu October 17, 2013

REVIEW | Whimsy Lightens the Dark in 'The Addams Family' Musical

Shaun Rice as Uncle Fester in the 2013-14 national tour of "The Addams Family."
Credit Carol Rosegg

They’re still creepy and kooky, but in “The Addams Family” musical, you can only snap along to that old theme song during the overture. With new songs and a story sourced not from the 1960s television show or the popular films but Charles Addams’ old New Yorker cartoons, the accomplished creative team behind the Broadway musical crafted a visually-rich, likable comedy by drawing on familiar Addams family character traits, gentle wit and a fun mix of musical styles.

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Arts and Humanities
6:50 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Passion Project: A Timelapse Tour of Louisville

Credit Eric Stemen

  Do you ever feel like time is slipping away? Today's very cool thing: a time-lapse tour of Louisville. Eric Stemen started by photographing Louisville from the Indiana side of the Second Street Bridge one day last year, almost by accident

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Arts and Humanities
2:00 pm
Tue October 15, 2013

Kentucky Shakespeare Plans Central Park Stage Restoration

Wadia Newman's new rendering of the C. Douglas Ramey Amphitheatre in Central Park.
Credit Wadia Newman / Kentucky Shakespeare

Kentucky Shakespeare artistic director Matt Wallace says in the past, the company would spend the first couple of weeks of their season in Central Park repairing the C. Douglas Ramey Amphitheatre to get the stage in shape for the summer productions. This year, he says he'd rather not put off needed repairs until after the winter, so the company has launched a Power2Give crowdfunding appeal to raise funds needed to restore the 20-year-old stage.

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Arts and Humanities
10:52 am
Tue October 15, 2013

Louisville Artist Cuts Through Pain With Chainsaw

Andrew Marsh's “Meat me in the middle,” black walnut, elm and maple with iron.
Credit University of Louisville

Andrew Marsh was a full-time metal artist when he suffered a severe back injury about ten years ago while building St. Louis' City Museum. His days of welding giant steel structures were over, but you can't keep an artist from creating. Now the assistant director of the University of Louisville's Conn Center for Renewable Energy Research, Marsh works in recycled iron and reclaimed wood. And he's traded large-scale welding projects for a new tool of choice: the chainsaw.

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Arts and Humanities
12:30 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

REVIEW | Actors Theatre Scales Unexpected Heights With 'The Mountaintop'

Dominique Morisseaux and Larry Powell in Actors Theatre of Louisville's production of Katori Hall's "The Mountaintop."
Credit Bill Brymer / Actors Theatre of Louisville

With a legend comes tension, often between two camps: those who relish exposing their all-too-human flaws and those who need some things and people sacred. Because we long to feel closer to our heroes, but there’s no guarantee we’ll like what we see if we’re allowed too close. Playwright Katori Hall takes great pains to humanize Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from the top of her award-winning play “The Mountaintop,” depicting him as a flawed man who struggles with ego, vanity, self-doubt, fear and fidelity, but the play achieves a rare balance and takes equal care with King’s legacy, too.

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Arts and Humanities
4:01 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Louisville Orchestra Names New Executive Director

Andrew Kipe

The Louisville Orchestra has a new executive director. Andrew Kipe will step into the leadership position November 11. Kipe comes to Louisville from the Phoenix Symphony, where he was general manager.

The Phoenix Symphony didn’t escape the woes that plagued  many American orchestras during the Great Recession, and when he came to Arizona, Kipe faced some of the same industry-wide financial and labor issues that led the Louisville Orchestra to file chapter 11 bankruptcy in 2010 and created a prolonged labor dispute that resulted in a canceled 2011-12 season.

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Arts and Humanities
2:16 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

Kentucky Opera Premieres New Work on Benjamin Franklin

"Portrait of Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790)" by Joseph-Siffrein Duplessis
Credit Metropolitan Museum of Art

Ben Franklin’s wit and wisdom is well-documented, but his stormy relationship with his illegitimate son William is often overlooked in founding fathers history.  The tension between the famous patriot and his son, who stayed loyal to England during the Revolutionary War, proved fertile dramatic ground for librettist Terry Teachout and Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Paul Moravec, who tackled the story for their third opera collaboration, “The King’s Man.”

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