Arts and Humanities

Arts and Humanities
2:44 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Humana Festival Playwright Dorothy Fortenberry on 'Partners'

Playwright Dorothy Fortenberry's "Partners" is her Humana Festival debut.

The 38th annual Humana Festival of New American Plays at Actors Theatre of Louisville opens this week.

The first production to open is “Partners” by Dorothy Fortenberry, which has its first preview Wednesday and opens Friday.

Directed by Lila Neugebauer, “Partners” is the story of two best friends with big plans – opening a food truck business, starting families – but an unexpected financial windfall makes them reevaluate how they feel about their commitments.

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Arts and Humanities
6:44 pm
Mon February 24, 2014

Speed Museum Discovers Hidden Klee Among Collection

The rediscovered Klee watercolor.
Credit Speed Art Museum

The Speed Art Museum has been taking advantage of the major construction and renovation project that has shuttered its main building for three years by assessing and restoring parts of its permanent collection. When Nashville-based paper conservator Christine Young received "Seven Blossoms," a Paul Klee drawing from the Speed's collection, and removed its original acidic paperboard mount to replace with safer material, she discovered a second, hidden piece of Klee's on the reverse side. 

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Arts and Humanities
10:30 am
Mon February 24, 2014

Kentucky Poet Laureate Frank X Walker Wins NAACP Image Award

Credit Rachel Eliza Griffiths

Frank X Walker, Kentucky's first African American poet laureate, won the 2014 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work in Poetry for "Turn Me Loose: the Unghosting of Medgar Evers," a collection of persona poems that explores the life and assassination of the civil rights pioneer, who was murdered in Mississippi by Byron de la Beckwith 50 years ago last summer. "Turn Me Loose" was published by the University of Georgia Press in 2013.

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Sun February 23, 2014

Exploring the Works of Black Classical Musicians

William Grant Still
Credit Library of Congress

Classical music can be easily generalized as a white, European art form. But the last 150 years proves that it's an art that is more diverse and nuanced.

For example, Chevalier de Saint-Georges (1745-1799), the son of a planter and his slave, was a virtuoso violinist and conductor of orchestras in Paris.  And Beethoven wrote for the famous violinist named George Bridgetower, who was of African and Polish ancestry.

In the 20th century, classical music became an art form for anyone who wanted it.

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Arts and Humanities
10:43 am
Sat February 22, 2014

REVIEW | Louisville Ballet Tells a Strong Story with 'La Sylphide'

Erica de la O dancing the title role in the Louisville Ballet's "La Sylphide."
Credit Wade Bell / Louisville Ballet

This weekend brings Louisville balletomanes the opportunity to see the Louisville Ballet's production of Danish choreographer Auguste Bournonville's 1836 Romantic ballet “La Sylphide.” This is only the second time that the full ballet has been produced under artistic director Bruce Simpson's tenure, although the fall 2012 Studio Connections program included a cutting from Act Two, programming that suggested that the company was ready once more to essay this epitome of Romantic ballet in full.

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Arts and Humanities
6:00 pm
Fri February 21, 2014

Generated by Enthusiasm: Actors Theatre Announces New Season of Plays

Emily Gunyou Hulaas, Dominique Serrand, Megan Hill, Nathan Keepers in "Fissures (lost and found)" in the 2010 Humana Festival. Serrand and Keepers are collaborating on a new adaptation of Shakespeare's "Love's Labors Lost" for the upcoming Actors Theatre season.
Credit Harlan Taylor / Actors Theatre of Louisville

Actors Theatre of Louisville will re-mount a revised production of Naomi Iizuka’s “At the Vanishing Point,” a play written about Louisville’s Butchertown neighborhood that premiered in the 2004 Humana Festival of New American Plays, in their next season. The theatre announced the next season’s lineup today.

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Arts and Humanities
6:00 am
Fri February 21, 2014

New Louisville Orchestra Music Director To Open Next Season With Own Work

Teddy Abrams
Credit Louisville Orchestra

The Louisville Orchestra has announced its next season of classics programming, which opens Sept. 6 with music director designate Teddy Abrams conducting Gustav Mahler's Symphony No. 1 in D Major and a new composition, yet to be written, by Abrams himself. 

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Arts and Humanities
4:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Emerging Louisville Artist Transforms Digital Information to Analog Artifact

Benjamin Cook
Credit Erin Keane / WFPL News

The internet is ephemeral by nature – two screenshots of the same page taken a minute apart could contain vastly different content. But Louisville artist Benjamin Cook is taking screenshots – those instantaneous captures of fleeting information – one step further in his new exhibit "Amusing Myself," which opens tonight at Swanson Contemporary. 

“Amusing Myself” is Cook’s first solo show. The exhibit runs through March 29. 

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Arts and Humanities
12:00 pm
Mon February 17, 2014

Narratives in Wood: Essential Elijah Pierce Exhibit at KMAC

Credit Kentucky Museum of Art and Craft

  Elijah Pierce was one of Ohio’s most acclaimed self-taught artists and one of the first African American wood carvers to rise to international prominence during his lifetime. Born in rural Mississippi near the turn of the century, Pierce lived and developed his artistic eye in a Columbus, Ohio barbershop three and a half blocks from the Columbus Museum of Art, where many of his significant pieces now reside. Pierce died in 1984.

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Mon February 17, 2014

Louisville Ballet Leaders Care for Choreography Without Ego

Kristopher Wotjera and Erica de la O in "La Sylphide."
Credit Bill Brymer / Louisville Ballet

The Louisville Ballet opens the final full production of its season this week. Danish choreographer August Bournonville's “La Sylphide,” one of the oldest surviving Romantic ballets, runs Friday and Saturday for three performances in the Kentucky Center’s Whitney Hall. 

The ballet, which opened in Copenhagen in 1836, is set in Scotland, where an engaged man’s obsession with a mythical fairy-like creature threatens his impending marriage. And it's told in a very specific style of ballet. 

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