Arts and Humanities

Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Sat June 21, 2014

Who Will Play the First Louisville Outskirts Fest? Tara Jane O'Neil, Antietam, and More

Tara Jane O'Neil
Credit Megan Holmes

Organizers of the new Louisville Outskirts Festival have been busy staging fundraiser shows for the inaugural festival celebrating women and music planned for October 10-12. Last night, for the organization's third benefit show, the guys got involved - all-male groups (how often do we get to specify that?) Xerxes, Coliseum and Anwar Sadat took the stage at The New Vintage to raise some money for the nonprofit, and organizers made their first of several announcements about lineup and venues for the October event.

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Arts and Humanities
12:31 pm
Fri June 20, 2014

'Drinking Perfume': A Traditional Rom-Com With An Original Heart

Sean Keller and April Singer in Lindsay Price's "Drinking Perfume" at The Bard's Town Theatre.
Credit Doug Schutte / The Bard's Town

The barefoot wild child with the Technicolor hair chiding him to chill out. The prissy nerd with the bowtie and glasses sniffing disapprovingly at her disheveled life. If you’ve seen an “opposites attract” romcom in the last, oh, forty years, you’ve seen the opening scene of Lindsay Price’s “Drinking Perfume,” where two people who couldn’t appear to be more different are thrust together to argue about how different they are, before finally giving in to mutual attraction, cue the hot stage kiss and scene.

Fans of Neil Simon, particularly the comedies like “Barefoot in the Park,” will find the meet-cute opposites-attract premise of “Drinking Perfume” familiar and welcoming, but Price tweaks the well-known tropes here (uptight guy and free-spirited gal meet in the middle, fall in love) enough to find the original heart beating beneath.

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Arts and Humanities
2:16 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

YA Playwright Takes A Break To Write Award-Winning Adult Comedy

Lindsay Price, playwright. Her comedy "Drinking Perfume" won The Bard Award and will have its world premiere at The Bard's Town Theatre this week.
Credit Lindsay Price

Lindsay Price’s new romantic comedy is making its world premiere this week at The Bard’s Town, where it won the Bard Award, rising to the top of hundreds of submitted scripts to be selected for production this season. “Drinking Perfume” was the runner-up for the Bloomington Playwrights Project’s Reva Shiner Comedy Award last year. The play opens Thursday in the theater upstairs from the Highlands restaurant.  

Directed by Beth Tantanella, “Drinking Perfume” is a romantic comedy about Stan (Sean Keller) and Claudie (April Singer) – a nerdy guy in a bow tie and a pink-haired manic pixie dream girl type – thrust together by an unseen force that knows that there’s more to both of them than meets the eye.

Stan and Claudie are a bit different from Price’s usual protagonists in one way – they’re adults. Price has a thriving career as writer of plays for schools and student performers, like a young adult (YA) novelist for the stage.

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Arts and Humanities
2:20 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Frazier History Museum Names Interim Director

Paula Turner Hale, interim executive director, Frazier History Museum
Credit Frazier History Museum

The Frazier History Museum has named an interim executive director. Development consultant Paula Turner Hale will lead the Louisville institution while the board of directors engages a national director search. Executive director Madeline Burnside, who led the museum for seven years, retired at the end of last month.

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Mon June 16, 2014

Theatre [502] Opens New Season: From Louisville to Paris, With Love

Ryan Lash and Kate Bringardner in Theatre [502]'s production of Mat Smart's "The 13th of Paris."
Credit Gil Reyes / Theatre [502]

In just three seasons, Theatre [502] has established itself as a necessary addition to Louisville’s theater scene. The company has staged the Louisville premieres of award-winning playwrights’ work that otherwise might go unproduced locally, from Sarah Ruhl's "Dead Man's Cell Phone" to Annie Baker’s “The Aliens.”

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Sun June 15, 2014

What You Need to Know About Charles Wright, the New U.S. Poet Laureate

Charles Wright, the newly-appointed U.S. Poet Laureate, reading at the Lannan Center for Poetics and Social Practice, Georgetown University, 2013.
Credit S L O W K I N G. / Wikimedia Commons

The Library of Congress announced Thursday that the next U.S. Poet Laureate would be 78-year-old Charles Wright. Wright, who is retired from the University of Virginia, is the author of more than 20 collections of poems. His work has won nearly every major award, including the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Ruth Lilly Prize. 

Wright is a Tennessee native, and succeeds Natasha Trethewey, an Atlanta-based poet with roots in Kentucky. His appointment is for one year, though the Library of Congress may extend it for two. The duties of the position are left largely to the individual laureates to define. Wright, for his part, tells NPR that he'll "probably stay here at home and think about things."

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Arts and Humanities
3:00 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Photos: Kentucky Shakespeare's Return Draw Big Crowd

Credit Alix Mattingly/WFPL News

Kentucky Shakespeare opened its 54th Shakespeare Festival Thursday with “A Midsummer Night's Dream”  in the C. Douglas Ramey Amphitheatre in Old Louisville's Central Park. 

About 700 people showed up. 

This year’s Shakespeare Festival comes with some changes, including an extended stage, a wireless microphone system to amplify the actors’ voices—as well as a new artistic director, Matt Wallace.

Related: Erin Keane's Review of "A Midsummer Night's Dream."

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Arts and Humanities
12:01 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Kentucky Shakespeare Makes Triumphant Return to Central Park Stage

Tony Milder as Puck in Kentucky Shakespeare's "A Midsummer Night's Dream."
Credit Matthew Chappell / Kentucky Shakespeare

Last summer, things weren’t looking so hot for the oldest free outdoor Shakespeare festival in the country. Kentucky Shakespeare’s summer season in Central Park had dwindled to a single professional production, which then closed early due to managerial issues that culminated in the artistic director’s resignation in July. But when former artistic associate Matt Wallace, then head of Shakespeare Behind Bars, came back to the company as the new artistic director, he promised he’d turn things around and make the Kentucky Shakespeare Festival better than ever, all on a smaller budget than his predecessor’s.

Wallace planned three high-quality professional productions running in repertory for the price of one, along with a high school conservatory show and four community partner productions (for a total of 56 performances, running through mid-August) by employing local talent and resources and good old-fashioned community partnership. Here’s more on the full schedule.

If last night’s opening of the festival is an indication of the full season to come, Wallace has delivered on his promise.  

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Arts and Humanities
11:59 am
Thu June 12, 2014

Bunbury Theatre Closes Season with Likable Production of 'Art'

Dale Strange (Serge), Phil Lynch (Marc) and Joshua Loren (Yvan) in The Bunbury Theatre's production of Yasmina Reza's "Art."
Credit Bunbury Theatre

Your friend spends an extravagant amount of money on a painting. The painting, for all intents and purposes, looks like a solid white canvas. He insists it's beautiful, you insist it's garbage and he's been swindled by art-world pretense. Who's right? 

That's not really the question at the heart of Yasmina Reza's comedy "Art," which instead explores the relationships between Marc, Serge and Yvan, three men who find their friendships tested in the wake of Serge's purchase of a $200,000 all-white (or is it?) painting. 

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