Arts and Humanities

Arts and Humanities
5:36 pm
Fri June 8, 2012

"Pilgrim Song" Screens This Weekend in Louisville

The annual Flyover Film Festival is this weekend in Louisville. One of the films on the roster is Pilgrim Song, a film shot in Louisville, which tells the story of an out-of-work musician who decides to walk the entire length of the Sheltowee Trace.

Pilgrim's Song co-writer and director, Martha Stevens, and the film's star, Timothy Morton, spoke with WFPL's Erin Kean on Friday's Byline.

 

 

 

Arts and Humanities
4:24 pm
Wed June 6, 2012

Speed Museum Begins Staff Re-Organization

The Speed Art Museum has eliminated eight full-time staff positions. The cuts were made in anticipation of the Speed’s $50 million renovation and expansion project, which will close the museum to the public until September 2015.

The affected positions are spread throughout the museum’s divisions and include jobs in visitor experience, collections, facilities, education, IT and security.

Museum director and CEO Charles Venable says some of the cuts were made in order to create new positions more closely aligned with the museum’s goals during its renovation period.

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Arts and Humanities
2:42 pm
Tue June 5, 2012

Back with the Band: Drummer-Turned-Filmmaker Produces My Morning Jacket Documentary

My Morning Jacket frontman Jim James with "One Big Holiday" producer Christopher Guetig during filming.
Margot Landen

Once upon a time, a guy from Louisville named Christopher Guetig played drums for My Morning Jacket. Those were the hard-touring van years, between the release of the critically-acclaimed “At Dawn” and the 2003 breakthrough hit “It Still Moves.”

It’s an old story. Guy leaves band, band makes it big. But this is not an episode of “Behind the Music.” Guetig doesn’t really regret leaving the band for Los Angeles to pursue an acting career in 2002, when they were all still up-and-comers.

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Arts and Humanities
4:04 pm
Mon June 4, 2012

Review: Typographical Dystopia a Love Letter to the Printed Word

Laurene Scalf as Professor Lorraine Wexler in Theatre [502]'s production of Jordan Harrison's"Futura."

Five years ago, when playwright Jordan Harrison began writing “Futura,” the death of print still sounded like an ominous prophecy, one that could be enlarged into the stuff dystopian fantasies are made of. Today, that dread is palpable to some, and the paperless future is almost here.

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Arts and Humanities
9:30 am
Mon June 4, 2012

Louisville Music Entrepreneur Launches Digital Video Platform

Todd Smith has been a musician, a record producer and most recently, the owner of a record label, the now-defunct Louisville-based Label X. He says Label X did everything right – solid artists with fans, radio play, coveted television spots – but none of that translated into sustainable record sales.

“After the digital revolution and file sharing and everything, consumers began to think of recorded music as a free commodity. You saw record sales in free-fall. The revenue model that the recorded music industry was built on, for all intents and purposes, eroded,” says Smith.

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Arts and Humanities
4:00 am
Fri June 1, 2012

First Friday Five: June

John King

It’s fine to hit the downtown First Friday Trolley Hop without a plan. Park, wander in and out of galleries, grab a drink or dinner with friends and hop a TARC trolley from one end of downtown to the next and back—you’re sure to find something to catch your eye or ears.

But with so many events and gallery receptions happening at once, it’s easy to get overwhelmed, so every month we take a look at five don’t-miss art events happening during the hop.

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Arts and Humanities
3:40 pm
Thu May 31, 2012

Theatre [502]'s 'Futura' Is Now

Betsy Huggins and Laurene Scalf in Theatre [502]'s production of "Futura" by Jordan Harrison.
Bill Brymer

When director Amy Attaway started working on Jordan Harrison’s typographical dystopian play “Futura,” she had just bought her first iPad. One of the first news stories she read on her tablet was about Encyclopedia Britannica discontinuing its print edition.  The sinister future Harrison devised, where handwriting, printing, paper and books are outlawed and all written materials are part of “The Big Collection” in the cloud, suddenly felt very close.

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Arts and Humanities
3:53 pm
Wed May 30, 2012

Novelist Creates Own Drinking Game at Readings

courtesy of Patrick Wensink

Louisville author Patrick Wensink has discovered one simple strategy to help people pay attention during book tour readings. He’s made a drinking game out of his.

“I’ve always felt like the worst part of a book reading is the book reading,” says Wensink. “I’m as guilty as anybody. I’ve sort of zoned out in the past and haven’t paid attention to every word.”

Wensink hands out a list of six words before he reads an excerpt from his new novel. Every time he reads one of the key words, everyone (author included) takes a sip.

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Arts and Humanities
5:39 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Surreal Play Introduces Kids to Magritte

Belgian surrealist painter René Magritte was known for his playful use of mystery–men in overcoats and bowler hats floating, an apple or a boulder suspended in mid-air. Sometimes silly, always evocative, he captured the imagination of art lovers of all ages.

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Arts and Humanities
2:41 pm
Tue May 29, 2012

Win VIP tickets to the International Mystery Writers' Festival

WFPL is proud to sponsor the International Mystery Writers' Festival in Owensboro June 14-17. The festival will feature performances of 3 new mystery plays, daily book signings and author workshops including an evening with Max Allan Collins, author of Road to Perdition.

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