The Bard's Town

Arts and Humanities
10:11 am
Fri November 1, 2013

REVIEW | New Comedy ‘Rx’ Explores Symptoms and Cures for Workplace Depression

Brian Hinds (Phil) and Beth Tantanella (Meena) in The Bard's Town's production of Kate Fodor's "Rx."
Credit Doug Schutte / The Bard's Town

Have you ever felt like you were destined for greater things than the annual pig price report? In Kate Fodor’s deceptively lighthearted romantic comedy “Rx,” a frustrated writer has traded her MFA in poetry for a job as the managing editor of American Cattle and Swine Magazine, a desk from which she creeps daily to the old lady underpants section of a neighboring department store to weep bitter tears of frustration and humiliation.

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Arts and Humanities
2:44 pm
Thu September 26, 2013

Le Petomane Opens Tenth Season with Comedy Experiment

Kyle Ware and Kristie Rolape in Le Petomane Theatre Ensemble's "Test Subjects."
Credit Sean Donaldson / Le Petomane Theatre Ensemble

The Le Petomane Theatre Ensemble has been creating and performing original comedies in Louisville for ten years. They open their anniversary season tonight with “Test Subjects,” an original two-person comedy that pays homage to the troupe’s comedy influences.

“Test Subjects” runs through October 6 at The Bard’s Town.

Like all Le Petomane shows, “Test Subjects” started with a title and cast availability. Out of six ensemble members (they all share the artistic director mantle), Kyle Ware and Kristie Rolape were available, so they built the show from the ground up through the group’s highly collaborative devising process.

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Arts and Humanities
12:07 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

REVIEW | Ten-Tucky Festival Showcases Kentucky Playwrights

Tony Smith, Carol T. Williams, and Corey Music in Bill Forsyth's "Properly Served."
Credit Doug Schutte / The Bard's Town Theatre

The ten-minute play is a tricky little beast. Within strict time constraints, the playwright has to write a whole play: a full story featuring interesting characters who experience conflict, complications and some kind of change – all in ten minutes or less. It’s harder than it sounds, but it's also a relatively low-risk platform for theater companies to try out lots of new material. 

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Arts and Humanities
4:08 pm
Mon August 26, 2013

A Continuous Loop: Absurdist Comedy 'The Bald Soprano' Runs Back-to-Back

Brian Hinds and Victoria Reibel in Savage Rose Classical Theatre's production of Eugene Ionesco's "The Bald Soprano."
Credit Savage Rose Classical Theatre

When Tad Chitwood decided to direct a production of "The Bald Soprano," Eugène Ionesco’s absurdist satire of middle-class manners, he found the most common English translation from French a bit timid – not to mention out-dated, with its jokes about 1950’s British bourgeoisie.

“That doesn’t really resonate with American audiences," says Chitwood. "He was poking fun at clichés that don’t really exist anymore. Not only do they not exist, they tend to be British and French clichés of the mid-twentieth century. You’d read it and think okay, I guess that was funny once. So it had to be adapted, not just translated.”

Chitwood got to work on a new translation with an updated American sensibility. The show is produced by Savage Rose Classical Theatre, and it opens Friday at The Bard's Town.

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Arts and Humanities
3:09 pm
Fri July 26, 2013

REVIEW | The 99 Percent Strikes Back in 'Reduction in Force'

Ben Gierhart, Amy Steiger and Natalie Fields in "Reduction in Force" at The Bard's Town.
The Bard's Town Theatre

Corruption in the financial sector led some protestors to Occupy Wall Street, but San Francisco Bay Area-playwright Patricia Milton took her protest to the stage with "Reduction in Force," a 2011 comedy detailing one day on the luxurious campus of  Icarus Financial Services when news of a company-wide "RIF" (a euphemism for massive staff lay-offs) has spread.  The Bard's Town Theatre opened the Louisville premiere  last night.

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Arts and Humanities
2:02 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

The Upside of Downsizing: Workplace Comedy 'Reduction in Force' Opens at The Bard's Town

Ben Gierhart, Amy Steiger and Natalie Fields in "Reduction in Force" at The Bard's Town.
The Bard's Town Theatre

In the wake of the financial collapse of 2008, it’s a familiar story in Louisville and beyond – a corporation announces plummeting profits and staff layoffs, prompting a company-wide rash of panic, paranoia and self-preservation. But playwright Patricia Milton finds the biting humor in those tales of individual desperation and corporate self-interest in her workplace comedy “Reduction in Force.”  

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Arts and Humanities
1:05 pm
Mon June 24, 2013

REVIEW | The Price of Beauty Examined in 'Reasons to Be Pretty'

Cara McHugh as Steph and Doug Schutte as Greg in Neil LaBute's "Reasons to Be Pretty" at The Bard's Town Theatre.
The Bard's Town Theatre

Neil LaBute’s plays aren’t for the faint of heart. His relationship drama “reasons to be pretty” opens with a ferocious profanity-laden fight between a woman and her boyfriend who allegedly alleged to a friend that she wasn’t necessarily the prettiest girl in the room. There’s no warm-up, just a donnybrook of personal attacks and incriminations. It’s uncomfortable in that way that witnessing an intimate fight can be – do I laugh? Do I cringe? Is he lying? Is she overreacting? Yes.

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Arts and Humanities
6:17 am
Mon June 3, 2013

One-Woman Show at The Bard's Town Embraces Bad Role Models

Writer and performer Polly Frost revels in the life lessons she learned at the hands of nontraditional mentors in her new one-woman show, "Bad Role Models and What I Learned From Them." The show runs Saturday at The Bard's Town. New York-based Frost last performed in Louisville in 2011, with her show “How to Survive Your Adult Relationship With Your Family.” 

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Arts and Humanities
6:44 pm
Sat May 11, 2013

REVIEW | Gallows Humor Satisfies in 'Things We Want'

The Bard’s Town Theatre continues its season of notable newer work with Jonathan Marc Sherman’s 2007 “Things We Want,” a satisfying dark comedy about three emotionally-stunted adult brothers still living in their childhood home while attempting to figure out how to overcome their various fragilities before they kill themselves or each other. That sounds heavier than the play actually is—tonally, it’s a gallows humor-charged fight between the id and the super-ego with flashes of brilliance that resists taking its characters seriously enough to let them fall apart in any kind of realistic disintegration.

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Arts and Humanities
2:22 pm
Fri February 22, 2013

REVIEW | 'Chasing Ophelia' Is More than a Romantic Comedy

Beth Tantanella and Ryan Watson in "Chasing Ophelia" at The Bard's Town.
The Bard's Town Theatre

Neurotic writers manipulating their self-aware fictional characters isn’t a new device, but unlike similar stories, The Bard’s Town’s funny and engaging “Chasing Ophelia” isn’t concerned with picking the navel of the writer’s creative processes or artistic tensions. For a romantic comedy, this play’s concerns are remarkably, well, theological: is an unseen, omniscient being really in charge of us, and how do we deal with feeling abandoned by him?

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