Books

Arts and Humanities
2:07 pm
Wed November 13, 2013

New Biography Examines Richard Pryor's Singular Brand of 'Furious Cool'

He’s considered one of the best – and one of the most controversial – stand-up comedians of all time. But Richard Pryor’s influence went beyond the stand-up scene. Through his groundbreaking comedy albums, television specials, film and TV roles, he changed how Americans thought and talked about race, sex, class and addiction.

There’s a  new book about Pryor’s life and career.  “Furious Cool: Richard Pryor and the World that Made Him” is written by Louisville screenwriter David Henry and his brother Joe Henry, the songwriter and Grammy Award-winning producer.

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Arts and Humanities
3:39 pm
Tue October 29, 2013

Flame Run Gallery's Glass Sculptures Attract Young Readers

Tiffany Ackerman's glass sculpture "The Monster Book of Monsters," inspired by J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter books.
Credit Erin Keane / WFPL News

A fine art glass studio might sound like an unlikely venue for a kid-friendly exhibit, but Flame Run Gallery's "Bookworms," a show of glass art inspired by children's literature, is definitely an all-ages show. 

"I get that a lot," gallery manager and exhibit curator Tiffany Ackerman says with a laugh. "But this isn't the first child-friendly show we've had here."

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Arts and Humanities
6:42 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Frazier History Museum's Popular Poe Program Peers Into the Tell-Tale Heart

Daguerreotype of Edgar Allan Poe 1848, first published 1880. Taken by W.S. Hartshorn, Providence, Rhode Island, November, 1848 From LoC "Famous People" collection [1], Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division, Reproduction Number: LC-USZ62-10610
Credit Library of Congress

Beloved of weird kids and literary-minded adults alike, the popularity and influence of Edgar Allan Poe's poems and stories show no signs of flagging, even 164 years after his (quite mysterious) death. The Frazier History Museum knows—the museum has been bringing Poe's work to life during the Halloween season for four years now, adapting a total of 16 different stories and poems for the stage in intimate shows that tend to sell out early.

This year, alongside perennial favorites "The Raven" and "The Bells," the three-person cast will reprise their adaptation of the creepy monologue "The Tell-Tale Heart" as well as tackle some new material. The short stories "MS Found in a Bottle" and "The Fall of the House of Usher" will join "Annabel Lee" and "Dreamland" to round out the program.

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Arts and Humanities
3:43 pm
Tue October 8, 2013

Southern Novelist Tim Gautreaux Headlines Writer's Block Festival

Tim Gautreaux

A reading by award-winning Louisiana novelist Tim Gautreaux will headline the annual Writer's Block Festival this weekend. The festival  returns for the third year with a full schedule of (mostly free) literary events for writers and readers. 

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Arts and Humanities
4:00 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Listen | Tom C. Hunley Reads a Poem for Simpsons Bus Driver Otto

The InKY Reading Series returns to The Bard's Town tonight at 7 p.m. with readings by Kentucky poet Tom C. Hunley and Spalding University MFA in Writing alum Marci Rae Johnson, with a special emerging writer reading by Louisville poet John James. 

The monthly reading series is free and features an open mic.

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Arts and Humanities
2:46 pm
Fri August 23, 2013

'Turn Me Loose': Ky. Poet Laureate Frank X Walker's New Book on Medgar Evers

Credit Rachel Eliza Griffiths

Kentucky's poet laureate Frank X Walker has a new book out. "Turn Me Loose: The Unghosting of Medgar Evers" (University of Georgia Press) is a collection of persona poems about the life and assassination of the civil rights pioneer, who was murdered in Mississippi by Byron de la Beckwith 50 years ago this summer. Evers was the first NAACP field secretary for Mississippi, and he was instrumental in the desegregation campaign at the University of Mississippi and the efforts to bring murdered Chicago teen Emmett Till's killers to justice. 

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Sat June 29, 2013

Unbound: Kirby Gann and Jacquelin Gorman on 'Windows Into Other Worlds'

On today’s episode, we’re catching glimpses into other worlds – into a hospital’s viewing room, where the dead are presented before they’re moved, and out a car window, where a prank unravels into an adventure. Hasn’t everyone dreamed of having super powers? In our first story, a boy with a secret identity reaches for something like power for the first time in Kirby Gann's “Anybody But Me.”   Then, we make the rounds with a hospital chaplain and look into the viewing room in Jacquelin Gorman's "Ghost Dance." 

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Unbound: Jacinda Townsend and Neela Vaswani on 'Object Permanence'

On today’s episode, we’re looking at the objects that define people and their place in time. In our first story, we go back to the 1960s, to Eastern Kentucky, to an odd little house in the country with no right angles. Jacinda Townsend reads “Rhombus,” a chapter from her forthcoming novel. Then, we climb into a white Chevy Nova and head to Astoria. It's 1979, and a grandmother has traveled from Bombay to New York to watch her grandchildren for the summer. Or are they keeping an eye on her? Neela Vaswani reads "Five Objects in Queens."

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Thu June 27, 2013

Unbound: Silas House and Manuel Gonzales on 'The War at Home'

On today’s episode, we’re going behind the front lines in the war at home. In our first story, a young boy in Eastern Kentucky writes to his pen pal, an Indian immigrant living in Manhattan, about life in the mountains during the 2008 elections. Silas House reads a chapter from “Same Sun Here.” Then, a man shrinks his wife and gives her a doll house to live in. The wife doesn’t take it lying down. Manuel Gonzales reads “The Miniature Wife.”

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Wed June 26, 2013

Unbound: Matt Bell and Brian Leung on 'Far Away, So Close'

On today’s episode, we’ll consider the distance between two people. What keeps a couple bound together, and what drives them apart?  In Matt Bell's “For You We Are Holding,” a city throbs with missed connections and swells with the memories of all that we want and what we have lost. Then, an estranged wife returns home to a sick dog and brings hope with her in Brian Leung's “Dog Sleep.”

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