Books

Arts and Humanities
10:52 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Kentucky Poet Pens NY Times Op-Ed on Conservatism

The New York Times published an op-ed by poet Maurice Manning yesterday on his understanding of conservatism. In the essay, the Kentucky native and Washington County resident explains how he exercises his conservative values through his work on his farm and in his rural community:

Read more
Arts and Humanities
2:34 pm
Fri November 2, 2012

Louisville Novelist's "Ghosting" Makes Year's Best-of List

Louisville author Kirby Gann's third novel "Ghosting" was named to Publisher's Weekly's 2012 top fiction book list

Gann is managing editor at Louisville's Sarabande Books and teaches fiction writing in the Spalding University Master of Fine Arts in Writing program. He is the author of "The Barbarian Parade" and "Our Napoleon in Rags," also set in Kentucky. 

Read more
Arts and Humanities
4:11 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Justin Torres to Read from Acclaimed Debut Novel

Gregory Crowley

Updated: Tonight's reading at 21C has been canceled due to Hurricane Sandy-related flight cancelations. Sarabande Books is working on rescheduling the event for 2013.

Justin Torres' surprising and haunting debut novel "We the Animals" introduces us to three near-feral brothers and their young parents, a white mother and Puerto Rican father from Brooklyn who marry when the mother is only 14 and pregnant with the oldest boy. They move to a small town in upstate New York, where they are outsiders even among the other poor families, and struggle against the limitations of their poverty, lack of education and youth.

“They’re these city kids, this mixed-race couple, in this tiny little town,” says Torres. “There aren’t many supporting characters in this book. There are the boys, and there’s Ma and Paps, and it’s very essential in that way. I wanted it to be, to emphasize the claustrophobia of the family, how much they rely on each other and how much they can’t escape each other.”

(Read an excerpt of "We the Animals.")

Read more
Arts and Humanities
4:03 pm
Thu October 25, 2012

Excerpt: 'We the Animals' by Justin Torres

"We the Animals," by Justin Torres

Excerpt from Justin Torres' new novel, We the Animals.

"Never-Never Time"

We all three sat at the kitchen table in our raincoats, and Joel smashed tomatoes with a small rubber mallet. We had seen it on TV: a man with an untamed mustache and a mallet slaughtering vegetables, and people in clear plastic ponchos soaking up the mess, having the time of their lives. We aimed to smile like that. We felt the pop and smack of tomato guts exploding; the guts dripped down the walls and landed on our cheeks and foreheads and congealed in our hair. When we ran out of to­matoes, we went into the bathroom and pulled out tubes of our mother’s lotions from under the sink. We took off our raincoats and positioned ourselves so that when the mallet slammed down and forced out the white cream, it would get everywhere, the creases of our shut-tight eyes and the folds of our ears.

Read more
Arts and Humanities
3:07 pm
Tue October 23, 2012

A Few Honest Words: New Book Explores Pop Music in Kentucky

  • An interview with author Jason Howard about his new book, "A Few Honest Words."

WFPL's Erin Keane speaks with Kentucky author Jason Howard about his new book, “A Few Honest Words: the Kentucky Roots of Popular Music."

In the book's introduction, Howard quotes songwriter Harlan Howard when he writes, “if there is a creed that defines roots music, it is that it consists of ‘three chords and a truth.’”

Read more
Arts and Humanities
1:53 pm
Thu October 11, 2012

Manning, Wilkinson Readings Open Writer's Block

Readings by two acclaimed Kentucky writers will kick off the Writer's Block Festival  at the InKY Reading Series Friday. Poet Maurice Manning and fiction writer Crystal Wilkinson will read from recent work at The Bard's Town (1801 Bardstown Rd.). The free event also includes an open mic and a set by musicians A Girl Named Earl and Mike Karman. 

Read more
Arts and Humanities
5:01 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

Kentucky Author Revisits Lost Colony Mystery in Debut Novel

Gwenda Bond’s debut young adult novel “Blackwood” (Strange Chemistry) revisits one of America’s most enduring mysteries. On modern-day Roanoke Island, 114 people disappear – the same number that vanished from the island's lost colony in the 16th century. Two misfit teens, Miranda (daughter of the town drunk) and Phillips (who hears the voices of the dead) team up to solve both mysteries in order to bring back their missing neighbors.

Read more
Arts and Humanities
4:30 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

Writer's Block Festival Offers Workshops, More

The annual Writer's Block Festival is Saturday, with workshops, panel discussions and readings for writers and readers scheduled in and around the Green Building (732 E. Market St.) and the Cressman Center (100 E. Main St.). Produced by Louisville Literary Arts, the event also features a print fair in the Green Building (through 4 p.m.) with exhibits by local and regional small presses and literary journals. 

Read more
Arts and Humanities
4:56 pm
Fri June 15, 2012

Author Charles Newton on Why He Writes Fiction

Charlie Newton, author of "Start Shooting," will read and lead a workshop at Second Story Books this week.
Lisa Law

"Charlie Newton is an over-sized character," WFPL's Erin Keane says, "almost like a character in one of his books." Newton, author of "Start Shooting," will read and lead a workshop at Second Story Books this week, and Erin spoke with him about why he writes fiction (with a heavy emphasis on authenticity) rather than non-fiction. She joined us on Friday's Byline to talk about their conversation.

 

 

Arts and Humanities
4:35 pm
Tue June 12, 2012

Crime Novelist Charlie Newton Marries Truth and Fiction

Charlie Newton, author of "Start Shooting," will read and lead a workshop at Second Story Books this week.
Lisa Law

Novelist Charlie Newton weaves complex plots of crime and corruption out of unrelated true stories. The rape and murder of a young girl and a strange history of biological warfare in Japan collide in “Start Shooting,” the Chicago native’s acclaimed second novel.

While a gang war threatens the city’s bid for the Olympics, a guitar-playing cop and a desperate actress from the same gritty Chicago neighborhood are forced to confront corruption, violence and the legacy of a family murder.

Read more

Pages