Commentary

Commentary
12:58 pm
Thu October 23, 2014

Pining From Louisville to Have Seen the World's Innovations at the World's Fairs

Credit Bob Peak

It has been a half century since the last truly “great” world’s fair was held in the Flushing Meadows section of New York City near LaGuardia Airport. And for most Americans alive today, the grand international exhibitions that were popular for about a hundred or so years seems oddly quaint.

However, in the era before television, the Internet and other rapid forms of mass communications, World’s Fairs were important ways to display new inventions, new products and sometimes landmark architectural structures.

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Commentary
7:00 am
Thu October 9, 2014

Celebrating the History Surrounding the Belle of Louisville

Credit Submitted photo

Beginning on Tuesday, Louisville will see the largest collection of passenger steamships gathered at its wharf in many years. The Festival of Steamboats, which continues through Oct. 19, is the city’s celebration of the 100th birthday of the Belle of Louisville.

Roughly half of the steamboat's lifetime has been spent as the Belle. In 1962, then-Judge-Executive Marlow W. Cook took the bold step of buying the steamboat (at that time known as the Avalon) at auction for what many in town considered the outrageous price of $34,000.

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Commentary
1:22 pm
Thu September 4, 2014

Revisiting The New Yorker's 1974 Examination of Louisville, a 'City in Transition'

Credit Creative Commons

“City in Transition” is the title that The New Yorker gave its lengthy story about Louisville in the Sept. 9, 1974, issue. Yes – 1974 not 2014. That was only 40 years ago, but it is still relevant today. Fred Powledge, the author, captured a moment in our city’s history that, viewed today through the lens of forty years, was remarkably perceptive. It deserves our renewed attention.

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Commentary
12:45 pm
Thu August 21, 2014

Commentary: When Washington was Our American City

Credit Creative Commons

I read with interest, and a good bit of sadness, the story in The New York Times this week about the decline of the U.S. Senate Dining Room, apparently yet another victim of the noxious partisanship in our nation’s capital.

It seems that the days when Republican and Democratic senators could put aside their differences to meet for scrambled eggs and bacon first thing in the morning are going the way of the afternoon cocktails in the majority leader’s office.

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Commentary
3:40 pm
Wed August 6, 2014

Commentary: With Nixon's Resignation, an Era of Division Began

Richard Nixon
Credit U.S. National Archive

Forty years ago, on August 8, 1974, Richard Nixon appeared on national television to announce that the following day he would resign, the first and so far the only American president to do so. For those of us who were around back then, it was an unforgettable experience, which was greeted with relief, mostly, because the long ordeal of what came to be known as the Watergate Affair had sapped the energy and patience of the nation.

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Commentary
1:50 pm
Thu May 29, 2014

The Role Moderate Republicans, Including Kentuckians, Played in the Civil Rights Act

Credit Time

Some will remember the dramatic scenes in Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln” in which the House of Representatives, under  pressure from Abraham Lincoln, debates, and then passes, the 13th Amendment to the Constitution, which barred slavery. Others may remember the musical film “1776,” based on historic records, which recreated the debate in Philadelphia over the Declaration of Independence. In both cases, the opponents were generally men of property (yes, they were all men then) and men whose sympathies were with landed Southern aristocracy.

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Commentary
5:14 pm
Thu May 15, 2014

Art Is Not a Luxury: 'Parkland Rising' Mural Project Caught in Political Crossfire

The Green mailer
Credit Submitted photo

An election mailer sent by Metro Council District 1 candidate Jessica Green this week took her opponent in Tuesday’s primary election, incumbent Attica Scott, to task over a public art project in the Parkland neighborhood, suggesting that art should not be a priority for the low-income Parkland neighborhood.

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Commentary
1:02 pm
Thu December 12, 2013

Kentucky's Intersection of Religion, Energy and the Environment

Sister Claire McGowan, one of the authors of the Energy Vision statement, speaking Tuesday at the Interfaith Prayer Ritual on Boone Farm in Nelson County, Ky.
Credit Courtesy of Diane Curtis/Sister of Charity of Nazareth

Most of the snow from a string of storms over the past week had evaporated in Nelson County, Ky., Tuesday afternoon when more than 60 concerned people, many of them Roman Catholic nuns, gathered on the Boone Family Farm to declare an Energy Vision, and with it they hope to launch a nationwide movement to oppose the practice of “fracking” for natural gas and the transport of its byproducts through pipelines. Their region known as the Kentucky Holy Land contains extensive land holdings by various religious orders. The stewards of these many acres understand that with land comes power, and a good number of them are dedicated to use that power to stop what they see as an onslaught against the earth’s sacred soil, sacred air and sacred water as well as the safety and well-being of human communities.

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Commentary
6:51 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Louisville's Suzy Post: At the Gates of Freedom

Suzy Post
Credit John Nation

Not long ago, we marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington, that seminal moment when the eyes of the nation focused on 250,000 demonstrators in Washington, D.C., and where Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his immortal “I Have a Dream” speech. It was the moment when civil rights in America moved to center stage, not to budge again until major changes occurred in the law, and in time, in the way we live in America.

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Commentary
7:11 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Recalling Stewart's Department Store Amidst a Fourth Street Revival

Credit Submitted photo

One afternoon last week I was pleased to see that a chain link fence has been erected around the old Stewart’s department store building at the corner of Fourth Street and Muhammad Ali Boulevard. Once the busiest corner in the city when downtown was the center of shopping and movie-going for the region, the building has stood empty for seven years, ever since Hilliard Lyons moved its headquarters to the PNC Tower. The fence is a sign that some construction is about to begin on the site, and that’s great news.

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