Commentary

Commentary
1:02 pm
Thu December 12, 2013

Kentucky's Intersection of Religion, Energy and the Environment

Sister Claire McGowan, one of the authors of the Energy Vision statement, speaking Tuesday at the Interfaith Prayer Ritual on Boone Farm in Nelson County, Ky.
Credit Courtesy of Diane Curtis/Sister of Charity of Nazareth

Most of the snow from a string of storms over the past week had evaporated in Nelson County, Ky., Tuesday afternoon when more than 60 concerned people, many of them Roman Catholic nuns, gathered on the Boone Family Farm to declare an Energy Vision, and with it they hope to launch a nationwide movement to oppose the practice of “fracking” for natural gas and the transport of its byproducts through pipelines. Their region known as the Kentucky Holy Land contains extensive land holdings by various religious orders. The stewards of these many acres understand that with land comes power, and a good number of them are dedicated to use that power to stop what they see as an onslaught against the earth’s sacred soil, sacred air and sacred water as well as the safety and well-being of human communities.

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Commentary
6:51 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Louisville's Suzy Post: At the Gates of Freedom

Suzy Post
Credit John Nation

Not long ago, we marked the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington, that seminal moment when the eyes of the nation focused on 250,000 demonstrators in Washington, D.C., and where Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his immortal “I Have a Dream” speech. It was the moment when civil rights in America moved to center stage, not to budge again until major changes occurred in the law, and in time, in the way we live in America.

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Commentary
7:11 am
Sun September 1, 2013

Recalling Stewart's Department Store Amidst a Fourth Street Revival

Credit Submitted photo

One afternoon last week I was pleased to see that a chain link fence has been erected around the old Stewart’s department store building at the corner of Fourth Street and Muhammad Ali Boulevard. Once the busiest corner in the city when downtown was the center of shopping and movie-going for the region, the building has stood empty for seven years, ever since Hilliard Lyons moved its headquarters to the PNC Tower. The fence is a sign that some construction is about to begin on the site, and that’s great news.

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Commentary
1:00 pm
Thu August 15, 2013

Kentucky's Long History of International Diplomacy

Matthew Barzun
Credit U.S. State Department

Today in Washington, Louisville businessman Matthew Barzun will be sworn in as the United States ambassador to the Court of St. James’—in other words, the United Kingdom. As such, he joins a long line of Kentuckians who have gone off to represent their government in foreign capitals.

Actually, this is Mr. Barzun’s second ambassadorship. In the first Obama term, he served as our minister to Sweden. He seems to be the first Louisvillian ever to hold posts to two countries.

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Commentary
11:49 am
Thu August 8, 2013

The Washington Post's Special Ties to Kentucky

Credit The Washington Post

Katharine Graham and The Washington Post hold a special place and in my own “Personal History” (as she titled her Pulitzer Prize-winning autobiography).

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Commentary
4:58 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

UofL's Brandeis School of Law Impresses Years After Adversity

Credit Keith Runyon

Thirty-one years had passed since the last time I slipped into a graduation gown. Last Saturday afternoon, when I participated in the commencement exercises for the Brandeis School of Law’s Class of 2013, I marveled at how much things had changed since my own law class of 1982 graduated. My role was to introduce the commencement speaker, my longtime friend and colleague from The Courier-Journal, Howard Fineman. Howard is one of the nation’s leading journalists, having excelled in 30 years as a top political correspondent for Newsweek, as well as a political commentator on MSNBC. Now he is a pioneer in another field of journalism—online—as editorial director of the Huffington Post Media Group. I think he and I share an admiration for the law school where we were trained over three decades ago, and we’re not embarrassed to tell others about the advances it has made.

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Commentary
3:14 pm
Wed May 8, 2013

When a Young Louisville Reporter Searched for F. Scott Fitzgerald and Zelda Sayre

The 1925 cover of The Great Gatsby.

Thirty-nine years ago, as a very young Courier-Journal reporter, I traveled south by train to Montgomery, Ala., to connect with the world that novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald and his wife, Zelda, knew in the early part of the 20th Century. The “peg” for the feature stories I planned to write was the opening that spring of what was then the latest screen version of “The Great Gatsby,” a multi-million dollar adaptation starring Robert Redford, Mia Farrow, Sam Waterston and Bruce Dern.

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Commentary
10:48 am
Tue April 30, 2013

Kentucky Derby Festival Blossoms from Small Celebration to Source of Pride for Louisville

Credit Dan Previte/Creative Commons

Hundreds of thousands of people will converge on Louisville this week to enjoy the dozens of events that make up the Kentucky Derby Festival. But what many of those celebrants don’t realize is that the festival is a rather recent development in the Derby’s 138-year history, and was largely the work of an ambitious racing editor at the newspaper and the public relations people who had a vision for making the first week of May something more than a couple of horse races.

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Commentary
11:19 am
Fri March 15, 2013

Keith Runyon: More Lost Than a Grocer When Burger's Market Closes Saturday

Burger's Market closes Saturday.
Credit Keith Runyon

On Saturday, one of Louisville’s last remaining neighborhood markets will close. The owners made their own minds up. Nobody drove them out of business. But even so, the demise of Burger’s Super Market, at the corner of Ray Avenue and Grinstead Drive, is an occasion to take note of, and to mourn.

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