Food & Drink Week

Food & Drink Week
9:00 am
Thu November 28, 2013

Black Friday Shopping in Louisville? Here Are Tips for Staying Fed.

Credit Shutterstock.com

I horribly underestimated the need to prepare for the spectacle of Black Friday my first time out. My mother and I woke up at 5 a.m., still bleary eyed and bloated from the Thanksgiving feast the night before. We stopped by Burger King and had barely bitten into our Croissan’wiches when we arrived at the Target parking lot on Dixie Highway.

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Food & Drink Week
7:05 am
Thu November 28, 2013

Cheyenne Mize's Thanksgiving: Low-Key Dishes, Homegrown Vegetables

Cheyenne Mize
Credit Yep Roc Records

On Thanksgiving day, Cheyenne Mize will be with her mother, stepfather and stepbrothers in Louisville. It'll be a scene that plays out in homes throughout the city—and the nation—with good autumn food. Her stepfather is a traditional type when it comes to Thanksgiving dishes.

"My mom does them all really well, so we’re all fine with that," said Mize, who'll share a bill Sunday at Headliners Music Hall with Seluah.

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Food & Drink Week
10:00 am
Wed November 27, 2013

An Oral History of Bourbon in Louisville

Bourbon is America's native spirit. Federal law says so. But for people in Louisville, bourbon is even closer, sentimentally and literally. The city developed quickly through the growth of the bourbon industry, and the current downtown resurgence depends largely on spirit's continued popularity.

But it's been a twisted path from the first batch's debut and the latest distillery ribbon cutting. It's a story of taxes, Prohibitions, power and capitalism.

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Food & Drink Week
7:30 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Is Kentucky Limestone Water Indispensible for Bourbon?

The spring at Maker's Mark that originally provided water for the distillery's bourbon.
Erica Peterson WFPL

Water is an essential ingredient in bourbon. And many local distillers have long said the commonwealth’s unique limestone water distinguishes Kentucky bourbon from competitors. But how important is it really?

To legally be called bourbon, the spirit has to be made of mostly corn. It has to be aged in new charred-oak barrels. And it has to be made in the United States. There's no rule that dictates what type of water is used, but many local distillers say no matter what the law says, bourbon isn't bourbon unless it's made with limestone water.

It's a stipulation that goes back to the early days of bourbon. University of Kentucky geology professor Alan Fryar says it was easy access to limestone water that played an integral role in launching the bourbon industry here centuries ago.

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Food & Drink Week
5:45 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Damaris Phillips' Thanksgiving: Lots of Family and a Casserole

Damaris Phillips
Credit Joseph Lord/WFPL News

On Thanksgiving day, Damaris Phillips will gather at her aunt's Louisville home with her family—four siblings, aunts, uncles and more. Maybe 40 people. Maybe more.

And they all cook. And they're all good at it, she said.

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Food & Drink Week
11:40 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Non-Kentucky Micro-Distilleries Could Help Define What Comes After Bourbon

Credit kybourbontrail.com

Manager Nick Reifsteck looks at the stash of bourbons at Old Town Wine and Spirits in Louisville; there’s a wall full of brown liquor.

How many bourbons would you say you carry here at Old Town? I ask.

"I don’t know, a couple hundred. I don’t know, I’ve never counted them," he says.

Reifsteck points to only a few from out of state, but says there are more now than ever before.

“A lot of these boutique brands. They don’t even distill or age their own bourbons. They buy from other distillers and they label them however they want," he says.

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Food & Drink Week
9:00 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Is Old Forester Louisville's House Bourbon?

The Old Forester-shaped water tower, at Brown-Forman's corporate headquarters on Dixie Highway. An advertising budget bankrolled an insurance company-mandated water tower over what used to be a warehouse. The bottle no longer holds water, but it still advertises Old Fo' far and wide.
Credit Brown-Forman

Old Forester has quite the pedigree.

Founded in 1873, it’s older than Coca-Cola and was the first bourbon to be sold in bottles. Even during Prohibition, a special medicinal license kept Old Forester in production. And for Louisville, it’s the ultimate “buy local” bourbon—distilled, bottled and aged right here in the city.  

The spirit locals call “Old Fo'” might just be Louisville's house bourbon. At Old Town Liquors on Bardstown Road, they sell a lot of bourbon, and Old Forester is a best-seller. 

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Food & Drink Week
6:47 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Louisville Cooks, Here Are Tips to Avoid a Thanksgiving Disaster

The outcome to avoid this week.
Credit Shutterstock.com

We are delusional in the weeks before Thanksgiving. We convince ourselves that we can cook a 20-pound turkey because Alton Brown says it’s easy. We fill our grocery cart with bags upon bags of potatoes because the dehydrated flakes will just not do. We buy a rolling pin and a pastry blender because this will be the year we finally make that pie crust from scratch. And we sincerely believe that from our kitchens will emerge a display of culinary prowess that would make Martha Stewart clutch her pearls.

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Food & Drink Week
3:23 pm
Mon November 25, 2013

Legal Showdown Brewing Over Indiana Beer Temperature Regulation

Wikipedia

The state of Indiana is one the last places in the U.S. that regulates the retail sale of beer by temperature.

In the Hoosier State, only package liquor stores are permitted to sell cold, or to be more exact, “chilled” beer.    At convenience and grocery stores, the beer must be room temperature.

Some of those establishments are challenging the law in federal court, but Indiana’s liquor store industry isn’t staying quiet.

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Food & Drink Week
11:51 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Jennifer Lawrence's Favorite Thanksgiving Dish

Credit Lionsgate

Thanksgiving with the whole family can be difficult to arrange when loved ones don’t all live in the same place.

But what happens when one of those loved ones is an Academy Award-winning actress in high demand in Hollywood?

That’s the experience for Louisville native Jennifer Lawrence and her family. As part of our Food & Drink week, I asked Lawrence and her mother about their holiday plans.

“I’m going on vacation and I’m going to miss Thanksgiving by like one day, which I’m fine with that," Lawrence told me last week. "Leftovers are always better cold anyway.”

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