The Next Louisville

Education
4:57 pm
Wed February 20, 2013

Kentucky Students Make Strides in AP Testing

The College Board

Over 12,000 Kentucky public high school graduates took an Advanced Placement exam last year, according to new data released Wednesday by the College Board.

That’s nearly a 75 percent increase from Kentucky’s graduating class five years ago. Half of those students--or 6,067--received a high enough score to qualify for credit at the college level, which is a benefit of taking AP courses and exams.

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Education
3:32 pm
Tue February 19, 2013

Author Sarah Garland Tells Louisville's School Desegregation Story

Author Sarah Garland writes about Jefferson County's desegregation policy in "Divided We Fail."

Louisville native and author Sarah Garland spoke with WFPL about her new book, Divided We Fail: The Story of an African American Community that Ended the Era of School Desegregation.

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Education
4:00 pm
Mon February 18, 2013

Representatives from Louisville's Out-of-School Time Charter Share Ideas in Baltimore

Last year, members of Louisville's Out-of-School Time Charter sign partnership agreement.

Members of Louisville's Out-of-School Time Coordinating Council Charter will share ideas in Baltimore Thursday with other cities that are seeking to improve after school programming.

Louisville was one of nine cities nationwide that received a Wallace Foundation grant to improve systems supporting after-school programs. 

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Education
10:08 am
Mon February 18, 2013

Jefferson County Public Schools Students Respond to 'Academic Genocide' Comments

Last week the Jefferson County Board of Education responded to criticism from Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday, who referred to the district’s lowest performing schools as “academic genocide.”

At last Monday’s school board meeting District 7’s Chris Brady addressed JCPS staff members, including three principals of low performing schools, asking what the student response has been.

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Local News
3:46 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

JCPS Board to Holliday: Talk to Us Before Media

Commissioner Terry Holliday used the words "academic genocide" while referring the JCPS' failure to adequately turn around student achievement at some schools.

Jefferson County Public Schools officials have released the following letter to media regarding comments made by Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday.

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Education
12:00 pm
Fri February 15, 2013

Defining Failing Schools and Why Low Achieving Schools Aren’t Alone

Jefferson County Public Schools’ lowest-performing schools took a hit this week. First, Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday described the district's practices in a Courier-Journal article as “academic genocide.”

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Education
6:00 pm
Tue February 12, 2013

Kentucky Ed Commissioner: JCPS Shouldn't Be Surprised to See More State Intervention

Kentucky Education Commissioner Terry Holliday says his comments this week in a Courier-Journal article referring to JCPS’ lowest performing schools as “academic genocide” were “purposeful to get the community involved.”

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Education
11:00 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

JCPS Officials: State’s 'Priority' School Report Doesn’t Tell Full Story

Superintendent Donna Hargens addresses the media after Monday's board meeting.

Jefferson County Public Schools officials say there’s more to the report released last week showing a majority of the district’s lowest performing schools have not made adequate progress.

JCPS officials acknowledged at Monday’s board meeting more needs to be done to turn around the status of its lowest performing schools, but they say there have been some gains in student test scores.

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Education
6:00 am
Sun February 10, 2013

Jefferson County's 'Priority' Schools Struggle the Most

A majority of Kentucky’s priority schools—formerly known as persistently low-achieving—have not made adequate progress for turning around student achievement, according to a report presented to the Kentucky Board of Education this week. And Jefferson County is being singled out.

Of the 41 schools that have been deemed priority schools only 18 have made acceptable progress, said the education department's Susan Allred.

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Education
7:00 am
Mon February 4, 2013

How Some Louisville Teachers are Shifting Grading Practices and Redefining Success

Students and parents are often concerned with bad grades. Grades say a lot to colleges and universities and high scores on college entrance exams such as the ACT and SAT are important for getting into certain schools.

Depending on the teacher, points can be earned for class participation, going the extra mile to make visual presentations or through extra credit, among other measures.

That’s the way grading has been done the past century; educators including Brown School Principal Tim Healy say it should change.

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