theater

Arts and Humanities
12:20 pm
Fri September 14, 2012

Review: 'Wicked' Stars Shine Extra Bright

Jeanna de Waal as Galinda and Christine Dwyer as Elphaba in the touring production of "Wicked."
Joan Marcus Wicked the Musical

The Broadway in Louisville production of the smash hit “Wicked” opened Thursday at the Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts. The Tony and Grammy Award-winning musical depicts the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good, polar opposite witches from the classic tale “The Wizard of Oz,” as schoolgirls struggling with their ambitions, convictions and loyalty in an oppressive political climate.

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Arts and Humanities
6:00 am
Mon September 10, 2012

Review: Stylish Shakespeare Starts Actors Season Off Right

Elvy Yost as Juliet and Grantham Coleman as Romeo in "Romeo and Juliet" at Actors Theatre of Louisville.
Alan Simons Actors Theatre of Louisville

The new season at Actors Theatre of Louisville is off to a rousing start with an energized and stylish contemporary production of William Shakespeare's “Romeo and Juliet.” The season opener is both a homecoming for the director, Louisville native Tony Speciale, and a bright sign of things to come for the theater with new artistic director Les Waters at the helm.

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Arts and Humanities
4:00 pm
Tue September 4, 2012

Rock Musical Humanizes Mental Illness

Lauren McCombs (Natalie), Jeremy Moon (Dan), Melissa Shepherd (Diana) in CenterStage's "Next to Normal."
CenterStage

Louisville's CenterStage theater company continues its season this week with the regional premiere of the acclaimed rock musical “Next to Normal.” The show explores the impact of mental illness on a suburban family.

Brian Yorkey and Tom Kitt’s “Next to Normal” opened on Broadway in 2009 and won three Tony Awards, but when it won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2010, it joined the ranks of only a handful of musicals to earn that distinction.

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Arts and Humanities
1:02 pm
Fri July 27, 2012

Review: Faith and the Big Box Store - 'A Bright New Boise' Is Relevant, Riveting

The Bard’s Town Theatre broadens its focus this season with an outstanding production of Samuel D. Hunter’s “A Bright New Boise.” This tightly-wound family drama about a disgraced evangelical who takes a job at an Idaho Hobby Lobby won an Obie Award in 2011 and has enjoyed a number of exciting regional premieres over the last season by companies like Washington, D.C.’s Wooly Mammoth Theatre and Chicago’s LiveWire.

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Arts and Humanities
6:00 am
Mon July 9, 2012

Shakespeare in the Wild West

Shakespeare’s “Much Ado About Nothing” is one of the original romantic comedies, full of tropes you don’t have to be a Bard scholar to recognize: the bickering twosome who fight their mutual attraction until finally succumbing to each other’s unlikely charms, the tragic misunderstanding that derails a happy engagement, meddling relatives, scheming frenemies.

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Arts and Humanities
12:52 pm
Fri June 22, 2012

ArtPlace Grant Awarded to Harlan County Theater Project

The Appalachian Program at Southeast Kentucky Community and Technical College in Cumberland has produced original plays about prescription drug abuse, life in the coal mines and how young people decide to stay or leave Harlan County after graduation. The program compiles oral histories and interviews with Harlan County residents and turns them into plays about the present and future of Eastern Kentucky.

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Arts and Humanities
1:34 pm
Mon June 18, 2012

REVIEW: The Bunbury's 'Buried Child' Delivers

A dark secret haunts a rural Illinois farmhouse where a once-proud family molders in disgrace in Sam Shepard’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play “Buried Child.” The play is sometimes described as a dark comedy, and its humor does serve to occasionally diffuse the almost stifling tension that pervades the play. But ultimately, “Buried Child” is a disorienting tragedy about the dissolution of the American family and the legacy of shame that causes one household to unravel and curl violently inward.

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Arts and Humanities
6:00 am
Mon June 18, 2012

Review: 'Misses Strata': Crude Humor Satisfies in New Bipartisan Satire

The more things change, the more things stay the same. 2,500 years after Aristophanes first suggested women could end a war by kicking powerful husbands out of their beds in “Lysistrata,” the idea is still compelling to playwrights and politicians alike (a Michigan state representative recently suggested a similar strategy).

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Arts and Humanities
3:39 pm
Wed June 13, 2012

Pandora Ends Season with 'My Big Gay Italian Wedding'

It’s no wonder the wedding has been a staple of stage comedy since Shakespeare’s time. A wedding has all the elements of a stage production: a supporting cast and two romantic leads, an audience, costumes and even a script. The effort of producing a real spectacle can bring even the most experienced stage manager–or wedding planner–to his knees. 

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Arts and Humanities
8:00 am
Mon June 11, 2012

New 'Lysistrata' Adaptation Opens at The Bard's Town

Cara McHugh, Jennifer Levine, Amy Steiger, Beth Burrell, and April Singer in "Misses Strata."
Doug Schutte The Bard's Town Theatre

The Bard’s Town Theatre is resurrecting the ancient Greek story of Lysistrata in the premiere of a new comedy about sex, politics and patriotism.

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