ArtCraft

As WFPL's arts and humanities reporter, Erin Keane reports on the issues, trends, people and events that impact Louisville's arts landscape.

Every artist also develops a craft—those deliberate and perfected techniques and methods used to write a novel, shoot a film, create a sculpture or become a character on stage. 

On ArtCraft, you'll find reviews of plays, books and arts experiences, as well as the latest news and commentary on Louisville's arts landscape and a thoughtful exploration of how and why a particular piece of art works (or doesn't). 

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Arts and Humanities
4:00 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

Listen | Tom C. Hunley Reads a Poem for Simpsons Bus Driver Otto

The InKY Reading Series returns to The Bard's Town tonight at 7 p.m. with readings by Kentucky poet Tom C. Hunley and Spalding University MFA in Writing alum Marci Rae Johnson, with a special emerging writer reading by Louisville poet John James. 

The monthly reading series is free and features an open mic.

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Arts and Humanities
12:07 pm
Fri September 13, 2013

REVIEW | Ten-Tucky Festival Showcases Kentucky Playwrights

Tony Smith, Carol T. Williams, and Corey Music in Bill Forsyth's "Properly Served."
Credit Doug Schutte / The Bard's Town Theatre

The ten-minute play is a tricky little beast. Within strict time constraints, the playwright has to write a whole play: a full story featuring interesting characters who experience conflict, complications and some kind of change – all in ten minutes or less. It’s harder than it sounds, but it's also a relatively low-risk platform for theater companies to try out lots of new material. 

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Arts and Humanities
9:33 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Happy Friday: 'La Bohème' Star Performs Pop-up Opera Concert in Galt House Bar

Credit Kentucky Opera

Louisvillian Emily Albrink performs the role of Musetta in the upcoming Kentucky Opera production of Puccini's “La Bohème,” and to warm up, she and other cast members have been performing short pop-up concerts around town. Yesterday over lunch, she surprised travelers in the Galt House atrium bar and pedway with a song.

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Arts and Humanities
4:32 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Kentucky Opera Opens Season with Puccini's Starving Artists in 'La Bohème’

The Kentucky Opera returns this month with Giacomo Puccini’s “La Bohème,” the bittersweet story of artists living and dying and falling in and out of love in the cafés and garrets of 19th century Paris.

Puccini premiered “La Bohème” at Turin’s Teatro Regio in 1896, and it remains one of the top five operas performed around the world. Kentucky Opera opened last season with Puccini’s “Tosca,” another perennial favorite. The company last staged “La Bohème” in 2006.

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Arts and Humanities
3:31 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

'Boy Meets Boy' Musical Launches Pandora's Marriage Equality Season

Bill Solly and Donald Ward’s musical romantic comedy “Boy Meets Boy” premiered off-Broadway in 1975. It’s a sweet and charming old-school musical with a premise – in an alternate 1930s London, gay marriage is so normalized, it’s not even remarked upon – that was daringly ahead of its time.

The musical pairs a reclusive English lord who left his socialite groom at the altar with an American journalist sent to cover the scandal of King Edward’s abdication and engagement to the divorcée Wallis Simpson.

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Arts and Humanities
4:24 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Louisville Ballet Opens Season with 'Swan Lake'

The Louisville Ballet

The Louisville Ballet opens its new season with one of the most enduring stories in the classical dance repertoire. “Swan Lake” opens Friday in the Kentucky Center's Whitney Hall and runs for three performances through Saturday evening.

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Arts and Humanities
3:06 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

Quick and Close to the Bone: Marrow Street Theatre Focuses on Short Plays

Patrick White's set for "The Gardeners" in May, Tim Faulkner Building.
Brian Hinds Marrow Street Theater

The one-act play is having a moment. Once a vital component of American theater, the form thrived as curtain-raisers before three-act productions in a time when audiences expected to spend hours at the theater on an evening out. Its  popularity has faded in recent years in favor of ten-minute plays, which abound in Louisville, but following a significant handful of recent local productions, three Louisville theater artists are committed to giving these shorter world premieres a permanent home, too. 

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Arts and Humanities
12:53 pm
Mon September 9, 2013

'New' Van Gogh Painting Identified; Was In A Norwegian Attic

Alex Ruger, director of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, at the unveiling Monday of Vincent Van Gogh's Sunset at Montmajour.
Olaf Kraak AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon September 9, 2013 11:15 am

A painting that had earlier been thought to be a fake and had been stored for decades in the attic of a Norwegian home has now been identified as a long-lost work by Vincent Van Gogh.

Sunset at Montmajour has been authenticated thanks to "extensive research into [its] style, technique, paint, canvas, the depiction, Van Gogh's letters and the provenance," Van Gogh Museum Director Axel Ruger says in a statement posted Monday by the Amsterdam museum.

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Arts and Humanities
3:33 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

REVIEW | 'Noises Off' Opens Actors' 50th Season with Laughs

Jeremy Lawrence playing Selsdon Mowbray playing a burglar in Actors Theatre's production of "Noises Off."
Credit Bill Brymer / Actors Theatre of Louisville

Actors Theatre of Louisville launched its 50th anniversary season last night with a rowdy champagne cork pop. Opening night of Michael Frayn’s crowd-pleasing backstage comedy “Noises Off” truly felt like a celebration of all that is fun about live theater.

With gently bawdy wit and some impressive feats of physical comedy, the play offers an insider’s laugh at the theater world, but its broad humor and endearing characters also make the show accessible to a general audience.  “Noises Off” runs in the Pamela Brown Auditorium through September 22.

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Arts and Humanities
5:07 pm
Thu September 5, 2013

Failed State Inspection Delays Kentucky Center's Phone Upgrades

Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts.
Credit David Amsler / Flickr User

New cable placed throughout the Kentucky Center last year during a $100,000 telecommunications upgrades is going unused because it failed a state electrical inspection for safety reasons. 

Kentucky Center spokesperson Kim Baker says the cabling in question was deactivated after the inspector’s visit, is currently pending removal, and does not currently pose a safety risk. 

“It’s not live,” says Baker. “The advisement was to go ahead and disconnect the cable and disable it. That’s what we did.”

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