ArtCraft

As WFPL's arts and humanities reporter, Erin Keane reports on the issues, trends, people and events that impact Louisville's arts landscape.

Every artist also develops a craft—those deliberate and perfected techniques and methods used to write a novel, shoot a film, create a sculpture or become a character on stage. 

On ArtCraft, you'll find reviews of plays, books and arts experiences, as well as the latest news and commentary on Louisville's arts landscape and a thoughtful exploration of how and why a particular piece of art works (or doesn't). 

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Arts and Humanities
4:33 pm
Thu February 14, 2013

Kentucky Shakespeare Festival Summer Season Moving Forward

Kentucky Shakespeare Festival

Producing artistic director Brantley Dunaway confirmed today that the Kentucky Shakespeare Festival will stage a summer season. Though the organization produces the oldest free annual Shakespeare in the Park festival in the United States, the future of the festival was uncertain at the end of last season. 

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Arts and Humanities
11:35 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Frank X Walker Named Kentucky Poet Laureate

Rachel Eliza Griffiths

Gov. Steve Beshear appointed poet Frank X Walker the 2013-14  Kentucky Poet Laureate today.

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Arts and Humanities
7:30 am
Thu February 14, 2013

The Big Break: Surprises on Stage

On our audio diary series The Big Break, our emerging performers encounter some surprises on stage and learn that every show brings its unique challenges and opportunities. Actors Theatre of Louisville apprentice Samantha Beach receives her crew assignments from her Humana Festival "bible," Louisville Ballet trainee Claire Horrocks re-learns how to walk like "a real person" in "Romeo and Juliet" and Kentucky Opera studio artist Brad Raymond enjoys some noir-infused fun in "Don Giovanni." 

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Arts and Humanities
3:44 pm
Wed February 13, 2013

Meet the Man Who Made Baseball History in 'Jackie and Me'

John Vessels as Pee Wee Reese and Jeremy Sonkin as Jackie Robinson in Stage One's production of "Jackie and Me."
Credit Stage One Family Theatre

Stage One Family Theatre commemorates Black History Month with a play about Jackie Robinson, the first African American man to play in baseball’s major leagues. The first baseman broke the unwritten color barrier in 1947. The story takes a contemporary student back in time to witness Jackie Robinson’s historic first season with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

Playwright Stephen Dietz adapted the play from Dan Gutman’s novel, a volume in his “Baseball Card Adventures” series. 

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Arts and Humanities
10:51 am
Tue February 12, 2013

Million Dollar Quartet, Plus One

Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash, Elvis Presley and Marilyn Evans at Sun Studios, 1956.
Memphis Press-Scimitar

The photo ran in the Memphis Press-Scimitar the day after Sam Phillips brought then-unknown Jerry Lee Lewis and his mad piano chops into his Sun Studios to fatten up Carl Perkins'  follow-up to his hit "Blue Suede Shoes." Johnny Cash, already a star with "Folsom Prison Blues" and "I Walk the Line," was a buddy of Perkins', hanging around the studio during the session. When former Sun artist Elvis Presley dropped in, an iconic moment was born. 

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Arts and Humanities
4:26 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Louisville Artist Examines History Through Oil

"Khalid" by Daniel Pfalzgraf: charcoal, oil paint and used motor oil on paper

Louisville artist Daniel Pfalzgraf opens a new solo show at Swanson Contemporary (638 E. Market St.) this weekend. "Blindly Following History" is a series of portraits of the September 11 plane hijackers, a sequel of sorts to his 2010 exhibit "Oil and Water Don't Mix," which featured similar portraits of BP Oil executives.

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Arts and Humanities
11:03 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Brown Hotel Gallery Breaks Tradition With Local Art

"New Traditions" by Gibbs Rounsavall, enamel on wood
Gibbs Rounsavall

The Gallery at the Brown Hotel breaks away from recent programming --traditional landscapes and equestrian art, the safe brand of Kentucky art perhaps expected by the Brown's overnight visitors -- with a contemporary show featuring a short list of exciting  Louisville artists. The new show evoLOUtion (I see what you did there) takes a different approach, showcasing artists more likely to be seen in an East Market Street gallery than on a visitors' center postcard. 

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Mon February 11, 2013

Mozart Masterpiece Goes Noir

Still from "Gun Crazy," screening at Louisville Film Society on Wednesday.

The Kentucky Opera gives Mozart's masterpiece "Don Giovanni" a film noir makeover for the final production of the season. Mozart’s opera (with libretto by Lorenzo da Ponte) is based on the legends of Don Juan, the fictional unrepentant heartbreaker. In "Don Giovanni," the eponymous womanizer seduces Donna Anna then kills her father in a duel -- and that’s just the first scene.

“Don Giovanni” runs Friday evening and Sunday afternoon in the Brown Theater. 

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Arts and Humanities
7:30 am
Fri February 8, 2013

No Punchbacks: Le Petomane Builds Smart, Silly Shows from Scratch

Kristie Rolape tries on her mask and baby fists.
Erin Keane WFPL News

When the members of Louisville's Le Petomane Theatre Ensemble head into rehearsal for a new play, they don’t have a script. They don’t have a director. What they have is an idea and roughly 500 years of comedic history behind them.

Their new show, "No Punchbacks," is an homage to traditional Punch and Judy puppet shows, which owe a significant comedic debt to Italian commedia dell'arte. Co-artistic director Greg Maupin (all six troupe members are co-artistic directors) calls commedia “the sitcoms of 16th century Italy.”

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Arts and Humanities
7:00 am
Thu February 7, 2013

The Big Break: History Lessons

On our audio diary series The Big Break, our emerging performers learn and teach some unique history lessons.Louisville Ballet trainee Claire Horrocks gets fitted for costumes for the upcoming production of "Romeo and Juliet" and takes us on a tour of the costume shop. Actors Theatre of Louisville apprentice Samantha Beach uses Roman history to write a play in 24 hours, and Kentucky Opera studio artist Brad Raymond goes on tour to local schools, teaching American history through song.

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