Politics

In what appears to be a photo finish, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has unofficially won Kentucky’s Democratic presidential primary. The race was so close that Clinton will split the state’s 55 delegates with Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

Although the Associated Press said the race was “too close to call” as of early Wednesday morning, state election officials say all counties have reported completely.

Clinton took 46.76 percent of the vote with 212,550 votes, while Sanders took 46.33 percent with 210,626 votes.

Sanders swept coal country in Eastern Kentucky by wide margins, but Clinton took the populous metropolitan areas of Louisville, Lexington and Northern Kentucky.

With another state in the win column, Clinton would stymie some of Sanders’ momentum late in the primary season. Sanders has won seven of the previous 12 primary contests despite trailing in the delegate count with a narrow path to victory.

With all counties reporting, Clinton was ahead by fewer than 2,000 votes. More than 24,000 people — above 5 percent — voted “uncommitted” in the race, meaning they cast a ballot without weighing in on the presidential campaign.

Less than 21 percent of registered voters showed up to the polls.

Gray And Paul To Face Off In November

Lexington Mayor Jim Gray secured the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate on Tuesday. He’ll face incumbent Sen. Rand Paul in the general election.

Gray took 59 percent of the vote, while former Frankfort commissioner Sellus Wilder got 13 percent and Brandenburg physician’s assistant Ron Leach received 10 percent.

Paul resoundingly defeated two political newcomers, taking 85 percent of the vote.

Comer Makes A Comeback

Former Agriculture Commissioner Jamie Comer won the Republican nomination for the 1st Congressional District with 61 percent of the vote.

In the general election, he’ll take on Democrat and political newcomer Sam Gaskins, a veteran and former tobacco farmer.

Bratcher, Kemper, Rogers Bring Home Wins

Real estate agent Harold Bratcher won the Republican nomination for Louisville’s 3rd Congressional District; he’ll face incumbent Democratic Rep. John Yarmuth in the fall.

Incumbent 4th District Republican Rep. Thomas Massie had no primary challenger but will face Highland Heights resident Calvin Sidle in the general election in November. Sidle also had no primary challengers.

Longtime 5th District Republican Rep. Hal Rogers won 82 percent of the vote over newcomer John Burk. Rogers has no Democratic challenger in the general election.

Nancy Jo Kemper, a pastor and former executive director of the Kentucky Council of Churches, won the 6th District Congressional primary over Lexington engineer Geoff Young. She’ll face incumbent Republican Rep. Andy Barr in the general election.

Republican Rep. Brett Guthrie of the 2nd District is running uncontested this year.

Ryland Barton is the Managing Editor for Collaboratives.