Election 2020 Kentucky Politics

It’s Election Day and if you didn’t vote early by mail or in person, today is the last day for you to cast a ballot in this year’s General Election.

Kentuckians will weigh in on contests for president, the U.S. Senate, Congress, the state legislature and local elections this year.

As of Sunday, 933,409 Kentuckians have voted in person and 574,574 people have cast ballots by mail, for a total of 42% of registered voters in the state.

Turnout in Kentucky is expected to be about 70% in the election. The state record for turnout was 72% set during the 1992 presidential election.

Democrats have slightly outnumbered Republicans during early voting in Kentucky—as of Sunday, 740,584, or 44%, of Democrats have already cast ballots, while 528,819, or 43%, of Republicans have done so.

Voting on Election Day is a little different than it has been in the past. Most counties have fewer polling places than they usually do because of a scarcity of poll workers and an expansion of absentee voting during the coronavirus pandemic.

But every county still has centralized places to cast ballots in person on Election Day and you can cast a ballot at any of them, as long they are in the county you’re registered to vote in.

You can find where your county’s polling places are at GoVoteKy.com.

If you requested a mail-in ballot but never received one, you can still cast a ballot in person on Election Day, but you should plan some extra time to do so.

At your polling place, an election official will have you fill out paperwork canceling your request for a mail-in ballot to ensure you don’t vote twice.

If you have a mail-in ballot, but haven’t sent it in yet, the deadline to do so is today, November 3rd. County clerks will continue to accept mail-in ballots as long as they are postmarked by Election Day.

Mail-in ballots can also be dropped off during voting hours at polling places and county clerk’s offices.

Polls will be open on Election Day from 6 a.m. until 6 p.m., local time. Voters can cast ballots as long as they are in line by 6 p.m.

If you want to report suspected election law violations, contact the state attorney general’s office at 1-800-328-VOTE. The number of complaints received by the hotline on Election Day can be viewed here.

Ryland Barton is the Capitol bureau chief for Kentucky Public Radio.