Coronavirus Education

On Wednesday morning, for the first time, JCPS students were able to get the COVID-19 vaccine at school during the school day. The district held its first in-school pop-up clinic at Seneca High School from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.  

Principal Michael Guy said he’s wanted to provide in-school vaccination since the summer, when he realized it isn’t always easy for students or their families to access the vaccine.

“Being able to have that clinic inside your school where all the parent has to do is just sign off on the consent form, they come down, we give them the vaccination, is a big deal. It’s a big game-changer for us,” Guy said during a Monday press conference.

The district has held drive-through vaccination clinics and community clinics at other schools, but Wednesday was the first time students could get the vaccine at school during the school day. JCPS Health Manager Eva Stone said the district wants all students to have a chance to get vaccinated.

“We know that our more at-risk schools have historically had lower vaccination rates just of all immunizations, and so, in my mind, I would frame COVID with the same expectation and know that we have work to do to make sure that every child has access to this vaccine,” Stone said. 

About a third of children 12 and older in the county have yet to receive one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

Guy said staff have been trying to provide information to students and families about the vaccine in school and on social media. Coaches have been playing a role in educating student athletes about the benefit of the vaccine.

“Just last week, our coaches after practice for boys basketball were talking to some of the athletes that had questions,” Seneca High School Athletic director Paul Holien said.

JCPS officials said they plan to bring vaccination clinics to other high schools in the coming months.

 

Jess Clark is WFPL's Education and Learning Reporter.