Local News

In June, Louisville Metro Police indicated that a long-awaited racial profiling study may be made available by the end of summer.

That did not happen. 

The study will look at whether police racially profile when making traffic stops. Data on every traffic stop from April 1, 2012 to March 31, 2013 was collected for use in the study, said Deborah Keeling, the study’s lead researcher and the chair of the University of Louisville Justice Administration department.

“Every police officer who submitted a vehicle stops report for that 12 month period is included in this,” Keeling said on Tuesday.

LMPD spokesman Phil Russell told WFPL in June that the police “hope to have the official report of that collection period available later this summer.” 

In August, a different police spokesman said the study was weeks away from being released.

Tuesday is the first full day of fall.

Chief Steve Conrad requested the study in 2012. At the time, Conrad said he believed officers did fair police work, and he was requesting the study as a way to prove it.

On Tuesday, Keeling said the research side of the study is completed.  The results have “been forwarded to the chief” for review, she said.

Keeling said she could not speak to the specifics of the study until it is formally released by police, but she added that Conrad “seemed satisfied” with the initial findings.

Police spokeswoman Carey Klain said this week that she was unaware of the study’s status within the police department.  She added the study will be internally reviewed by the police department before it is publicly released.

Klain gave no specific date for expected release.

Neither the county attorney’s office nor the commonwealth attorney’s office have been asked to review the study findings, spokespersons said.

Correction: This story previously incorrectly stated the dates when data was collected for the study.

Jacob Ryan is a reporter for the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting.