Politics

Sen. Rand Paul isn’t sure a run for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination will be successful.

That’s partly why he asked state Republican leaders earlier this month to hold a presidential caucus next year instead of the usual primary vote, he said during a stop in Louisville on Friday.

Paul said he’s hopeful state Republican leaders will make this one-time exception to the usual practice of choosing a presidential candidate through a primary. But, even if they do, he’s not sure what the outcome would be of a presidential run.

“While I am hopeful and optimistic if I do this I could be the nominee, I don’t know that,” Paul said during an event at Sullivan University.

“So, really, this would eliminate any problems going through a presidential primary if I chose to.”

And, when asked about the legal ramifications of possibly winning both the GOP nomination for president and the U.S. Senate, Paul said he was unsure he’d get that far.

“It’s optimistic to think that we would have a general election issue,” Paul told reporters.

In the meantime, Paul is going through the process of setting up a possible presidential bid.

This week, Paul held events in Kentucky, Ohio and Alabama. He also confirmed an appearance at the New Hampshire GOP’s “First-in-the-Nation Republican Leadership Summit” this April, The New Hampshire Journal reported.

Paul, who lives in Bowling Green was first elected to the Senate in 2010, said he will likely announce whether or not he is running sometime in either March or April.

Before he makes a decision, he said he’ll be looking at whether he “has a real chance of winning.”