Election 2019 Kentucky Politics

Kentucky’s recanvass of last week’s gubernatorial election is underway and has produced few differences. Meanwhile all eyes are on Gov. Matt Bevin, who has not said he will concede the race if he loses the recanvass.

With more than two-thirds of all counties reporting, there is only one difference — an additional vote for write-in candidate Blackii Effing Whyte in Casey County.

Bevin requested the recanvass after initial results showed him losing to Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear by more than 5,000 votes.

Outgoing Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes invited incoming Republican Secretary of State Michael Adams to oversee the recanvass, which requires local election boards to double-check their vote totals.

Adams said he was “very satisfied” with the process.

“I want to reassure all Kentuckians that this is being done by the book. I especially want to reassure supporters of the governor, and I’m one of them, that this is being done correctly and by the book,” Adams said.

If the recanvass still shows Bevin behind, his only other option to challenge the election results would be to file for an election contest, which allows the legislature to determine the outcome.

Lawmakers from both political parties have encouraged Bevin to not do that, but Bevin has not said how he will proceed.

Meanwhile Bevin continues to promote unfounded claims about “irregularities” in the election. On Wednesday he encouraged his supporters to attend a press conference in Frankfort held by a group that made erroneous claims of voter fraud in last week’s elections.

Meanwhile top vote-getter in the election, Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear, has already begun building his administration.

Ryland Barton is the Capitol bureau chief for Kentucky Public Radio.